Hispanic Access Foundation internships

Throughout the past 5 years, the Hispanic Access Foundation has offered enriching internship experiences for Latinx upcoming professionals who are passionate about public land conservation and heritage preservation.

 

This year, we are happy to announce our new platform encompassing all of our professional opportunities, My Access to a Network of Opportunities (MANO) Project.  Please share this resource with your networks as we are currently recruiting for summer positions with the National Park Service – Latino Heritage Internship Program (LHIP)Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Bureau of Reclamations, and the National Credit Union Administration.

 

For more information regarding all programs and internship positions, please visit our website: http://www.manoproject.org/internships  

 

Lastly, please don’t hesitate to contact me at rodrigo@hispanicaccess.org with questions about these opportunities (or even just to say hello and talk about opportunities to collaborate!).

¡A heartful gracias and saludos!

Rodrigo Otárola y Bentín
Deputy Director 

Email: rodrigo@hispanicaccess.org
Desk: 202-640-5669 (9:00 am to 6:00 pm EST)
Cell: 801-400-5222

6-Month Positions Available as Restoration Team Members in Northern NV – Great way to start out in Ecology and Conservation!

POSITION TITLE: AmeriCorps Restoration Team Member

STATUS: Half Time, 900-hour term from February 19, 2019 to August 22, 2019

NUMBER OF POSITINS AVAILABLE: 20

REPORTS TO: AmeriCorps Program Manager

POSITIONS REPORTING TO THIS POSITION: None

LOCATION: Yerington, NV

 

BACKGROUND: Established in 2014, the Walker Basin Conservancy (WBC) is leading the effort to restore and maintain Walker Lake while protecting agricultural, environmental and recreational interests in the Walker Basin (www.walkerbasin.org). The nascent and dynamic nature of the WBC and its diverse management obligations provide unique opportunities to develop operations from the ground level up, working closely with staff who are passionate about their mission.

The WBC currently manages thousands of acres of land and assets on multiple properties in the Walker Basin.  Land planning activities are underway and focus on assessing public use opportunities, conservation values, long term land ownership and stewardship, active and passive revegetation and restoration activities. 

JOB PURPOSE: The Restoration Team Members will serve alongside other members and WBC Conservation Technicians conducting primarily invasive species removal and native plant re-vegetation within the Walker River Basin. Members may also work on recreational trail construction, sign installation, and fence construction. Members will work in conjunction with other WBC field staff, providing on the ground support to larger project operations.

A working knowledge of, or a desire to learn more about, desert plant ecology and ecological restoration, nursery or horticultural practices, or agricultural systems and irrigation equipment is essential. The Restoration Team Members should also have a sincere interest in expanding their knowledge of Great Basin Desert ecology, restoration practices, the flora and fauna of Nevada, and agricultural methods and equipment.

 

Members will serve in an outdoor setting and will sometimes be required to camp in the field for the duration of the tour. Camping will generally be in areas with at least primitive road access for crew vehicles, but the camping sites will usually be undeveloped backcountry sites. Both camp and project sites will generally not have access to potable water, restroom facilities, or cellphone signals, and members will be expected to follow Leave No Trace principals in camp and on project. Project work will frequently require hiking over rough terrain while carrying tools and equipment.

 

LOCATION: Yerington, Nevada is a beautiful rural farming community located approximately 95 miles south of Reno, NV in the foothills of the eastern Sierra mountains. Yerington is small but growing with about 3,100 residents. Established in 1907, the city has heritage and deep roots in agriculture, mining, railroads, and gaming. Some of the nearby attractions, activities and recreational opportunities include:

  • Camping, biking, hiking, backpacking
  • Fishing, hunting and boating and OHV trails
  • Flat and white-water boating (1 hour away) 
  • Rock Hounding and climbing
  • Ghost Town Exploration
  • Ski Resorts (1.5-2 hours away)
  • Lake Tahoe (1.5 hours away)
  • Lahontan Reservoir (30 minutes away)
  • Walker Lake (45 minutes away)
  • Topaz Reservoir (45 minutes away)

 

Primary Duties and Responsibilities

Primary Functions:

·        Under the guidance of a WBC Technician, utilizing hand tools, backpack sprayers, and ATV mounted sprayers to conduct invasive plant removal and control.

·        Under the guidance of a WBC Technician, utilizing hand and power tools to conduct native plant re-vegetation and restoration.

·        Under the guidance of a WBC Technician, utilizing hand and power tools to conduct road decommissioning, recreation trail construction, and sign/fence installation.

·        Communicating effectively and professionally with other members, WBC staff, agency partners, and the public.

Secondary Functions:

·        Assisting with the management and supervision of community volunteers on WBC conservation projects.

·        Uploading field data into databases and compiling reports to inform future management plans.

·        Assisting with the inventory, maintenance, and repair of WBC tools and equipment.

 

Qualifications

  • Willingness and ability to work outside in unpredictable weather conditions, including extreme temperatures, independently or as part of a team.
  • Willingness and ability to camp in undeveloped, primitive conditions for multiple days.
  • Willingness and ability to work irregular hours, such as starting early or working more days with shorter hours, in accordance with project specific requirements and conditions.
  • Ability to bend and crouch for long periods of time and occasionally lift heavy loads or equipment.
  • Ability to uses hand and power tools, operate motor vehicles, and work long days on labor intensive projects.
  • Willingness to use chemical herbicides in the treatment and control of invasive weeds while following strict application protocols.
  • Effective written and oral communication skills.
  • Possess a valid, state-issued driver’s license and clean driving record.
  • Meet AmeriCorps Eligibility Requirements, including:
    • Be at least 17 years of age at the commencement of service;
    • Have a high school diploma or its equivalent;
    • Be a citizen, national, or lawful permanent resident alien of the United States;
    • Pass a National Sex Offender Public Website check and National Service Criminal History Check; and
    • Be eligible to receive and AmeriCorps Education award, with a limit of four total terms in a lifetime and the equivalent of two full-time terms (3600 hours).

 

Compensation & Benefits:

  • Living allowance of $9,180;
  • Education award of $2,960;
  • Medical, dental and vision insurance, child care, and federal student loan forbearance are available for eligible members at no additional cost;
  • Uniform reimbursement;
  • Per diem when on spike (while camping);
  • Paid personal and sick leave; and
  • Paid holidays.

 

Members will receive a variety of technical and professional training related to their service activities as well as personal and professional development. Available trainings include:

  • First aid and CPR;
  • Leave no Trace principals; and
  • Plant identification, invasive species identification and treatment, and trails training.

 

Housing in Yerington can be difficult to find. WBC has limited and optional housing available for a low monthly rate. Housing accommodations are dorm or bunk style housing with shared bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchen areas and common spaces.

 

Positions will remain open until filled. Only top candidates will be contacted.

 

Local applicants are STRONGLY encouraged to apply. Please stop by our office to pick up or drop off an application or speak with our Field Manager Terence. Our office address is: 1 HWY 95 A East, Yerington, NV 89447.

 

Please send cover letter and resume to:

Amy Gladding

amy.gladding@walkerbasin.org

Subject Line: 6-month Restoration Team Member

 

OR fill out and return our employment application found online at our website, www.walkerbasin.org,  or at our Yerington office (1 HWY 95 A East, Yerington, NV 89447)

 

Please call Miguel Gonzales, AmeriCorps Program Manager, at (775) 463-9887 ext. 110 with questions.

 

Walker Basin Conservancy is an equal opportunity employer. Persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.  The above functions may be completed with or without reasonable accommodations.  This program prohibits discrimination based on race, religion, creed, color, national origin, gender, age, sexual orientation, political affiliation or disability.

 

Equal Opportunity Statement – Walker Basin Conservancy is an equal opportunity employer. WBC does not discriminate against any employee, applicant, director, officer, contractor, or any other person with whom it deals because of race, creed, color, disability, age, sex, veteran status, religion or political affiliation. WBC complies with all federal and local statutes prohibiting discrimination in employment.

 

Disclaimer – The statements contained herein are intended to describe the general nature and level of work to be performed by the employees in these positions. The statements are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities, duties, and skills required of a person in each position. Other responsibilities, duties, and skills may be assigned and management retains the right to add or change the responsibilities, duties, and skills at any time. 

 

 

Sage-grouse Research Technician in southern Montana

Greater Sage-grouse Technician in Southern Montana

We are looking for a technician to assist with a greater sage-grouse research project with the University of Wyoming. The project will focus on identifying priority seasonal habitat for sage-grouse in south-central Montana, near Bridger. The position will last approximately 3.5 months, beginning May 1st and ending in mid-August.

Duties will include: locating radio-marked grouse with radio telemetry and GPS; monitoring nests; nighttime brood counts; vegetation sampling using Line Intercept, Daubenmire and Robel pole methods; identifying sagebrush steppe shrubs and forbs; trapping grouse at night to attach rump-mounted transmitters; data entry and proofing; and operating 4WD trucks and ATV’s in remote and rugged terrain.

Work will require sharing camp trailers or apartments with other technicians, extensive hiking in rugged terrain, driving ATVs and 4WD trucks, long hours (> 40/wk; 10 or more hrs/day), and a willingness to endure potentially adverse environmental conditions including cold, heat, intense sun, dust, rain, snow, and biting insects. It is essential that applicants are able to work well with others and also work independently. Experience with grouse and/or vegetation surveys are a plus. Technicians will gain valuable wildlife and vegetation monitoring experience. 

Start Date: May 1, 2019
Final Date to Apply: February 10, 2019. 
Salary: ~$2000/Month, housing provided.

Qualifications
Those who have earned or are pursuing degrees in wildlife ecology/science, rangeland ecology/science, botany, zoology, biology, ecology or related fields are encouraged to apply.  
Successful applicants should have the ability to:
– Take detailed field notes
– Legibly record field measurements and enter it into Excel spreadsheets
– Follow instructions and survey methodologies
– Navigate using maps and GPS equipment
– Monitor birds using radio telemetry
– Work and live side-by-side with co-workers in shared housing
– Maintain positive attitude while working long days and >40 hrs/wk with variable work schedules and under extreme weather conditions
– Complete vegetation surveys
– Safely operate 4WD pickups and ATV’s 
-Work independently and as part of a team

Preference will be given to those who have experience in the above job duties, but experience with every aspect of the work is not necessary. However a willingness to learn is a must!

Please send a letter of interest (1 page), resume and contact information for 3 references as a single attached document (labeled with last name) via email to Erin Birtwistle. Applicants will be reviewed starting February 10th.

Contact person: Erin Birtwistle (ebirtwis at uwyo.edu)

Vegetation Monitoring Technician in southern Montana

Vegetation Monitoring Technician for Sage-Grouse Research in Southern Montana

We are looking for a technician to assist with a greater sage-grouse research project with the University of Wyoming. The project will focus on identifying priority seasonal habitat for sage-grouse in south-central Montana, near Bridger. The position will last approximately 2 months, beginning mid-May and ending in mid to late-July. 

Duties include vegetation sampling using Line Intercept, Daubenmire and Robel pole methods; identifying sagebrush steppe shrubs and forbs; navigating using maps and GPS; data entry and proofing; and operating 4WD trucks and ATV’s in remote and rugged terrain. Technician will be part of a 2-3 person crew and will have the opportunity to assist other technicians with locating radio-marked grouse using radio telemetry, monitoring nests, and nighttime brood counts.

Work will require sharing camp trailers or apartments with other technicians, extensive hiking in rugged terrain, driving ATVs and 4WD trucks, long hours (> 40/wk; 10 or more hrs/day), and a willingness to endure potentially adverse environmental conditions including cold, heat, intense sun, dust, rain, snow, and biting insects. It is essential that applicants are able to work well with others and also work independently. Experience with vegetation surveys are a plus. Technicians will gain valuable experience in fieldwork, and wildlife and vegetation monitoring.

Start Date: mid-May, 2019
Final Date to Apply: February 10, 2019. 
Salary: ~$1900/Month, housing provided.

Qualifications
Those who have earned or are pursuing degrees in wildlife ecology/science, rangeland ecology/science, botany, zoology, biology, ecology or related fields are encouraged to apply.
Successful applicants should have the ability to:
– Be detailed-oriented and take detailed field notes
– Legibly record field data and enter it into Excel spreadsheets
– Follow instructions and survey methodologies
– Navigate using maps and GPS equipment
– Work and live side-by-side with co-workers in shared housing
– Maintain positive attitude while working long days and >40 hrs/wk with variable work schedules and under extreme weather conditions
– Maintain positive attitude while completing repetitive and mundane tasks
– Assist with vegetation surveys
– Safely operate 4WD pickups and ATV’s
-Work independently and as part of a team

Preference will be given to those who have experience in the above job duties, but experience with every aspect of the work is not necessary. However, a willingness to learn is a must!

Please send a letter of interest (1 page), resume and contact information for 3 references as a single attached document (labeled with last name) via email to Erin Birtwistle. Please include dates you are available to start work. Applicants will be reviewed starting February 10th.

Contact person: Erin Birtwistle (ebirtwis at uwyo.edu)

PhD on the St. Lawrence Estuary Beluga population – Habitat selection, movement and fission-fusion dynamics

We are recruiting a PhD student to study habitat selection, movement, and social behaviour of the endangered St. Lawrence Estuary beluga population.

 

The project is part of a broader research program aimed at proposing effective solutions to mitigate the impacts of navigation on belugas in the St. Lawrence Estuary (ongoing process).

 

The full announcement is available at the end of this message.

 

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO FORWARD THIS ANNOUNCEMENT TO YOUR COLLEAGUES AND CIRCULATE IN YOUR NETWORKS

 

Thanks and have a nice day!

 

Clément

 

Prof. Clément Chion, PhD

Université du Québec en Outaouais (UQO)

Département des sciences naturelles

819-595-3900 poste: 1858

819-503-2539

 

 

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PHD SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY

Habitat selection, movement, and fission-fusion dynamics of the St. Lawrence Estuary beluga population 

 

Project Description: The St. Lawrence Estuary beluga population is currently listed as Endangered under the Canadian Species At Risk Act and the Loi sur les espèces menacées et vulnérables du Québec. Several threats to its recovery related to the navigation activities occurring in the population’s summer habitat are identified such as exposure to underwater noise and disturbance. Mitigating navigation impacts requires a good understanding of the factors underlying the behaviours of habitat selection along with the movements of this species in the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Saguenay (i.e. summer habitat). However, this understanding is currently incomplete because: i) few studies have tried to identify the mechanisms underlying the spatial distribution and movements of the belugas in the summer habitat, and ii) the rare studies did not consider beluga’s social behaviour or group fusion-fission dynamics. This PhD project aims at identifying the factors (biotic and abiotic) explaining the spatial distribution and the movements of beluga groups in their summer habitat, acknowledging that habitat selection behaviours and movements might be influenced by the social and gregarious behaviour of this species. The project will also look into the group fusion-fission dynamics in the beluga’s summer habitat by exploring the conditions (e.g. habitat characteristics, time of day, group size and composition) under which pairs of known individuals are encountered in the same groups or not. This will allow to interpret the spatio-temporal variation in group size and composition and ultimately contribute to explain the spatial distribution of this species in its summer habitat. This project will provide valuable knowledge to improve our understanding of navigation impacts on the St. Lawrence beluga’s habitat selection and movements in its summer habitat. These results will be integrated in a model that simulates the movements of individual belugas via a collaboration with modellers.

 

This project will be carried out using existing datasets and might also require additional fieldwork to collect new observational data. The selected candidate will be part of the Natural Science Department and will be based in Ripon (QC) at Institut des Sciences de la Forêt tempérée (ISFORT: http://isfort.uqo.ca/). She/He will work with researchers from the GREMM (Tadoussac) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Mont-Joli).

 

The desired candidate will show dynamism, motivation, intellectual curiosity and creativity, ability to work independently and as part of a team, along with a great sense of initiative. She/He will be encouraged and supported to travel for scientific communications (conferences, workshops), meetings with partners and stakeholders. The project funding is provided by the Government of Quebec. The selected candidate will contribute to the production of deliverables for the Ministry for Forests, Wildlife, and Parks and Ministry for Maritime Affairs on a yearly basis.

 

Skills: The candidate must hold a Master’s degree in biological sciences, or related field. The following expertise and skills will be considered as assets:

– expertise on animal behaviour related to habitat selection and movements;

– expertise on social behaviour and fusion-fission dynamics in gregarious species;

– expertise on marine mammals;

– great expertise in data management and analysis with R software.

 

Project start: September 2019

 

Treatment: 20 000$/year for 3 years

 

Director: Angélique Dupuch (UQO-ISFORT)

Co-director : Véronique Lesage (DFO)

Collaborators: Clément Chion (UQO-ISFORT), Robert Michaud (GREMM), and Tyler Bonnell (Lethbridge University)

 

Application: Email your academic CV (long form), all academic records for bachelor’s and master’s degrees, an application letter (detailing your skills and assets related to the project requirements), and the name and contact information of 3 academic references to:  angelique.dupuch@uqo.ca, clement.chion@uqo.ca, rmichaud@gremm.org, veronique.lesage@dfo-mpo.gc.ca, and tyler.bonnell@uleth.ca.

 

Applications will be considered until the position is filled.

 

 

PhD Position Available on Grassland Birds and Microclimates (UW-Madison)

PhD Position Available on Grassland Birds and Microclimates (UW-Madison)

We are seeking an outstanding student to lead a novel, multi-scaled quantification of microclimates within grassland conservation areas and evaluate their importance on the nesting biology of declining grassland bird populations. The student’s dissertation will involve quantifying microclimates in grasslands using both ground-based sensors and unmanned aerial vehicle (thermography), design and implement a concurrent study of nesting biology for grassland birds, and analyze citizen science data to   evaluate the importance of extreme events on grassland bird populations. This study will evaluate the potential of managing microclimates as a form of climate change adaptation. This is a USDA-funded collaboration in the department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at UW-Madison (Zuckerberg, Ribic) and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (Fink). The 4-year PhD assistantship will begin in the fall of 2019 (or possibly earlier).

Applicants must have a MS degree in ecology, forestry, geography, or other related discipline. We will only consider applicants with a BS degree if they have proven relevant experience. A solid working knowledge of avian ecology, population modeling, GIS, and statistics are required.  Although not a requirement, the preferred candidate will have strong experience in field ornithology, collecting and analyzing nest data, and species distribution modeling. Excellent English writing and verbal communication skills are essential.

Review of applicants will begin immediately, but the position will remain open until a suitable candidate is found. Applications received by February 8, 2019 are guaranteed full consideration. The University of Wisconsin-Madison is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. We promote excellence through diversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply. The position is open to both US citizen and international candidates. The project includes an annual stipend, plus tuition remission and health care benefits. We envision a start date of September 2019, but an earlier start date may be possible.

UW-Madison has a long history of excellence in ecology, conservation biology, remote sensing and geography. The university ranks consistently among the top research universities in the United States.  Total student enrollment is 43,000 of which approximately 12,000 are graduate and professional students, and there are over 2,000 faculty.  UW-Madison is an exciting place to learn and conduct research! The city of Madison ranks as one of the most attractive places in the U.S. to live and work.  For information about campus and city, please seehttps://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisc.edu%2Fabout%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmiranda.l.davis%40uconn.edu%7C1440ece10ba046c5b06608d67d356853%7C17f1a87e2a254eaab9df9d439034b080%7C0%7C0%7C636834065669133965&sdata=v1q5XrRvIJnujIY29VwzK%2FnSSjw%2B7YVxd7AgsMGgwSE%3D&reserved=0

To apply, please submit your application here:

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fuwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com%2Fjfe%2Fform%2FSV_80PigZ26vdDGFoh&data=02%7C01%7Cmiranda.l.davis%40uconn.edu%7C1440ece10ba046c5b06608d67d356853%7C17f1a87e2a254eaab9df9d439034b080%7C0%7C0%7C636834065669133965&sdata=nayD%2BbwszAVuU3o%2BlpTN5GkugxdQD6oyTfKwAfXpx4w%3D&reserved=0

Please note that submitting an application includes filling out a small survey (< 15 minutes), uploading a cover letter summarizing research interests and experiences, curriculum vitae, and unofficial transcripts or summary of relevant coursework (both undergraduate and graduate).

After reviewing all applicants, we will ask for reference letters from top candidates.

Summer 2019 Research Internships in Caribbean Marine Ecology – McCoy Lab at FSU

Summer 2019 Research Internships in Caribbean Marine Ecology – McCoy Lab at FSU

 The McCoy Lab at Florida State University seeks two research interns to conduct fieldwork in Bonaire, Dutch Caribbean during a 6-week period in June-July 2019.  All fieldwork will be conducted on SCUBA.  Interns will assist and be supervised by Ph.D. students Ethan Cissell and Joshua Manning (http://www.marecology.com/people).  Candidates must have (1) a valid American Academy of Underwater Science (AAUS) diving certification, or an international equivalent, (2) Enriched Air Nitrox certification, and (3) be at least 18 years or older by June 1, 2019. Experience conducting research is preferred, but specific knowledge of Caribbean marine ecology is not required.  Please contact Dr. Sophie McCoy with any questions (mccoy@bio.fsu.edu).

Research in the McCoy Lab focuses on mechanisms that retain ecological and biogeochemical function of coastal ecosystems.  To do this, we focus on links between physiological response and dynamics of populations and communities, and especially on the effects of environmental stress on traits that mediate species interactions.

Application materials:

Send application materials in a single pdf to Dr. Sophie McCoy by Feb. 22, 2019 for full consideration (mccoy@bio.fsu.edu).  We will conduct interviews by Skype in early March.

(1) statement of interest (1 page),

(2) brief CV (2 pages max.),

(3) dive log and certification, and contact information for your institution’s Dive Safety Officer,

(4) names and contact information of 2 professional references, and

(5) available dates during June and July 2019 (i.e., when do classes end, if an undergraduate).

Logistics and details: This is an unpaid position. Travel to and from Bonaire and lodging at a communal apartment will be provided, excluding meals. Because the two 2019 interns will share a room in the apartment, we will select either two male or two female interns.

Two Graduate Positions in Fish Behavior and Ecology

We (www.wagnerlabmsu.com) are seeking two motivated, skilled, energetic, and collaborative graduate students to join a cluster hire of four graduate students working on various questions related to the perception and response to predation risk in sea lamprey when migrating (either into rivers to spawn, or out of rivers to begin parasitic feeding). The work will integrate movement ecology, behavioral biology, and chemistry (semiochemical communication), and is conducted in collaboration with university and Federal scientists working in the U.S. and Canada. The scientific understanding developed will be used to examine theories surrounding the context-specificity of anti-predator tactic selection, and to develop novel, innovative approaches to controlling this species (where it is invasive) and conserving it (where it is threatened) that employ behavioral manipulations achieved by creating chemical information landscapes that guide the animal’s movement decisions. Both projects are funded by an international commission (www.GLFC.org), and will require interaction with agency managers and decision-makers, and public outreach.

 

If you are interested in applying for one of the projects listed below (or starting a conversation about either), please send a C.V. and cover letter addressing your graduate education and professional interests to Dr. Michael Wagner (mwagner@msu.edu), Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University.

 

Project #1 (M.S.): The successful applicant will study the out-migration timing and movement behavior of newly transformed parasitic sea lampreys (AKA macrophthalmia or ‘transformers’) in rivers draining to Lake Michigan. Our goals for this project are to (1) provide the first meaningful empirical insight into the movements and survival of wild juvenile sea lamprey during their out-migration from natal rearing grounds to the open waters of the Great Lakes, and (2) to demonstrate the utility of a new acoustic micro-transmitter for the study of juvenile sea lamprey, including the development of transferable protocols for tag implantation and holding practices. The project will integrate laboratory studies (surgical techniques and recovery, effects of the tag on swim performance and movement tendencies), and a field movement study to estimate reach-specific mortality rates experience by out-migrants by fitting a multi-state Cormack-Jolly-Seber model. The work will be in collaboration with university and Federal scientists working with the Hammond Bay Biological Station (Michigan) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Washington). The student will be co-advised by Dr. Travis Brenden of the MSU Quantitative Fisheries Center (www.canr.msu.edu/qfc/). Two years of funding are guaranteed (stipend $21K, tuition and health benefits are paid). Requirements: B.S. in fisheries, biology, ecology, aquatic or marine science/biology, or general biology. Experience in working with fishes or in streams is desired, as are quantitative analysis skills, a proficiency with R, or experience with acoustic telemetry equipment (especially the JSATS system). A highly competitive student will have a GPA > 3.3 and GRE scores above the 65thpercentile.

 

Project #2 (M.S. or Ph.D.): The successful applicant will study the behavioral ecology of an alarm cue in sea lamprey (a chemical mixture released from injured tissue) that warns conspecifics about the location of predation events. This project is part the second phase of a larger project to discover the chemical structures of the compounds that comprise the alarm cue odor. The student will examine the behavioral reactivity and ecological function of identified compounds and mixtures in an attempt to isolate the complete alarm cue (never before accomplished in fishes). Work will be in collaboration with a post-doctoral research associate in Dr. Muralee Nair’s laboratory at MSU (chemistry of natural products), who is leading the effort to identify the compounds. In addition to addressing fundamental questions of anti-predator behavior, the student will also test mixtures for use in repellent-based behavioral manipulations to achieve management and conservation goals. Three years of funding are guaranteed (stipend $21K, tuition and health benefits are paid). Requirements: B.S. in fisheries, biology, ecology, aquatic or marine science/biology, or general biology. Experience in working with fishes or in streams is desired, as are quantitative analysis skills and proficiency with R. A highly competitive student will have a GPA > 3.3 and GRE scores above the 65th percentile. For consideration as a Ph.D. student, an appropriate M.S. related to the fields described above is required. Expertise in animal behavior and behavioral ecology are preferred for a Ph.D. student.

PhD Microplastics – New Zealand

PhD opportunity – Microplastics

 

The Institute of Marine Science (IMS) and the School of Environment at the University of Auckland are looking for an excellent and highly motivated scientist with keen interests in the fundamental processes that may affect the distribution and fate of microplastics and their effect on various soft sediment ecosystem functions.

We are offering a fully funded interdisciplinary PhD project to investigate the interactions between microphytobenthos (MPB), microplastics in soft sediments and biological and physical processes at the sediment-water interface.

 

Desired skills and experience

This project is interdisciplinary therefore experience in experimental research (field and laboratory) in the areas of environmental engineering and/or benthic ecology would be highly desirable, as well as a motivated mindset.

A mixture of field surveys and manipulative experiments, flume experiments and the development of a machine-learning model may be used to couple various biological and physical processes to microplastic distribution and benthic ecosystem functioning.

The candidate is expected to develop their own research goals with the help of the PI Dr Julie Anne Hope (IMS). The candidate will also benefit from the additional support of Assoc. Prof Giovanni Coco (CO-I, School of Environment) andProf. Simon Thrush (CO-I, IMS) during different phases of the project. Work may be based between the city campus and/or the Leigh Marine Laboratory on the North Island of New Zealand.

To apply for this position, potential candidates should send a cover letter, a short research proposal for this project with details of the research that they would like to do (1 page max) and an up to date CV to Jaime Rowntree,jaime.rowntree@auckland.ac.nz

Background information on the Institute of Marine Science and life at The University of Auckland can be found at:www.marine.auckland.ac.nz/en.htmlwww.science.auckland.ac.nz/phdwww.international.auckland.ac.nz