Opportunities Archive

Job: MichiganStateU.GeneticsAdapationTechnician

The Lowry Lab at Michigan State University is currently seeking to hire a
field research technician. The technician will be hired through the
University of Texas, but be stationed at the Kellogg Biological Station in
Hickory Corners, MI. The research will be focused on a large collaborative
project studying adaptation in the bioenergy feedstock switchgrass. The
research will utilize new genetic mapping populations to identify genomic
regions responsible for adaptation between northern upland and southern
lowland ecotypes of switchgrass. These mapping populations have been
planted at an unprecedented geographical scale, spanning ten common garden
field sites distributed over 17 degrees of latitude, making them ideal for
studies of regional adaptations. The technician will be primarily
responsible for maintaining and gathering data from the switchgrass common
garden located at MSU’s Kellogg Biological Station (KBS). The technician
will also work in the laboratory of David Lowry on MSU’s main campus,
especially during winter months. The research will often involve all-day
physical activity outdoors. The technician will be expected to organize
data collection efforts and coordinate these efforts with the larger team
across the central United States. Applications for the position can be made
through the following link:
https://utdirect.utexas.edu/apps/hr/jobs/nlogon/170215014481

Minnesota_ChicagoBotanicGarden.ResearchIntern.PlantEvol

12 Month Research Internship 2017

Are you interested in gaining field research experience and learning about the
ecology and evolution of plants and plant-animal interactions in fragmented
prairie? The Echinacea Project is offering several year-long research
internships for graduates and soon-to-be graduates. This is a great
opportunity for individuals who are considering graduate studies and are
interested in gaining research experience. We have diverse potential
projects for students with backgrounds or interests in plant ecology,
pollination biology, evolution, statistics, conservation, and computer
science. In the past, interns have completed projects on a variety of
topics including pollination biology, prairie restoration, and
plant-herbivore interactions. In the summer, you will survey natural plant
populations, measure plant traits in experimental plots, hand-pollinate
plants, observe & collect insects, and assist in all aspects of research.
Summer housing in Minnesota (June – September) is provided and there is a
stipend. During the academic year (October – May 2018), interns will
develop independent research projects, gain quantitative and data
management skills, and coordinate citizen scientists in our lab, which is
based at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

QUALIFICATIONS
No experience is necessary, but you must be enthusiastic and
hard-working. Attention
to detail, a good sense of humor, and a positive attitude are
essential. Applicants
must be available to begin in Minnesota in early to mid-June. We welcome
and encourage scientists of all backgrounds, particularly those
underrepresented in science, to apply to work with us!

MORE INFORMATION
Information about our offerings for the 2017-2018 year are here:
http://echinaceaproject.org/opportunities/.

APPLICATION DEADLINE
Review of applications for year-long positions will begin on March 2nd.
Applications for summer REU positions are due on February 23rd.

The team and I are happy to answer any further questions.

Advanced student technician position in MARS

Hello
 
I’m looking for a new technician to work in MARS. We are a core service facility that focuses on medium and high throughput sample processing and next gen sequencing. This position would be really good for a student who’s had some molecular lab experience beyond just classes, is comfortable juggling many tasks, and is a fearless learner. If you have a particular student in mind that is looking for experience in a different kind of molecular lab or you manage a listserv, please forward this announcement. The job link and description are below.
 
Thanks
 
Kendra
 
 
 
Job Description
The MARS Facility has an opening for a Research Technician.  The technician will be responsible for sample processing from intake, next gen sequencing of libraries, and data analysis under the supervision of the facility scientist.  The position will be up to 20 hours per week while classes are in session, increasing to up to 40 hours per week when there are no classes.  We are looking for a student who can work at the MARS Facility for at least 1 year, starting in March 2017. Internship, independent research, and training opportunities maybe possible as well.
Job Requirements
Required qualifications:
  • Attention to detail
  • Ability to track multiple work flows simultaneously
  • Self-directed after initial training phase
  • Excellent written and oral communication
  • Experience with molecular techniques
  • Able to commit to at least one year of student employment.
Preferred qualifications:
  • Experience working with 10s or 100s of samples, DNA/RNA extraction, MiSeq, genome assembly, characterization of microbial communities by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and comfortable working with command line scripts and SQL
If you are interested and meet ALL of the required qualifiactions, submit a cover letter and CV (as a PDF) throug the online system.
 
 

Summer Field Crew – Forest Ecology Research in the Pacific Northwest

Forest Ecology Research in the Pacific Northwest (Summer 2017)

Overview: A crew leader and three crew positions are available this summer to collect data for the Pacific Northwest Permanent Sample Plot Program (http://pnwpsp.forestry.oregonstate.edu), one of the longest-running research projects of its kind in the world. Our objective is to understand the patterns and mechanisms of long-term forest dynamics. The field crew will take measurements on trees and understory vegetation across a diversity of forest types in Oregon and Washington. We seek individuals who are detail-oriented, able to follow complex data-collection procedures, have legible handwriting, enjoy working as part of a team, and can live cooperatively with others.

Duties: Field crew members will (a) navigate to permanent plots using topographic maps and GPS; (b) identify herbaceous and woody plants to species; (c) estimate percent cover of plants; (d) measure tree diameters and heights; (e) tag, measure and map tree regeneration; (f) document tree mortality; and (g) record and check data for completeness and clarity.

Logistics:  Crew will be based at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/ near Blue River, Oregon, where housing is provided. Some camping will also be necessary for sites located in Washington. Positions will last 13-15 weeks starting June 19, 2017. Applicants with previous experience may perform lead work.

Minimum qualifications:

– Enrolled in or graduated from a program in forestry, botany, natural resources, environmental science or closely related field; or an equivalent combination of training and experience.

– Experience collecting forest inventory data and navigating off-trail using compass, map and GPS.

– Skilled in plant identification.

– Able to work productively for long hours in rugged terrain and variable weather conditions.

– Demonstrated ability to work independently and with other crew members in a professional manner while maintaining a positive and safe work environment.

– Organized, self-motivated and detail oriented.

Preferred qualifications:

– Field experience identifying herbaceous and woody plant species and using taxonomic keys.

– Strong familiarity with the flora of the Cascade Mountains or the proven ability to quickly learn plants.

– Familiarity with basic vegetation measurement tools and methods.

– Knowledge of and experience in identifying causes of tree mortality.

– First-aid training.

– A demonstrable commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity.

Salary:   $14-$16/hour, depending on qualifications and experience

Job duration:  June 19, 2017 to mid- or late-September (13-15 weeks)

Application closing date:  Sunday, March 5, 2017

Application process depends on student status.  You are considered a student if you are enrolled for at least 6 credits in spring and intend to take at least 6 credits in the fall.

– Students: https://jobs.oregonstate.edu/postings/37884 or go to https://jobs.oregonstate.edu/ and search for posting P01730SE.

– Non-students: https://jobs.oregonstate.edu/postings/38456 or go to https://jobs.oregonstate.edu/ and search for posting P00763CT

– To apply, create account, click on “Apply for this Job,” and follow the instructions.

– FMI: Rob Pabst, Department of Forest Ecosystems & Society, Oregon State University (rob.pabst@oregonstate.edu<mailto:rob.pabst@oregonstate.edu>)

M.S. Research Assistantship in Barred Owl Ecology: Clemson University

The Barrett Lab in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Conservation at Clemson University is accepting applications from prospective MS students. The selected candidate will begin in either summer or fall 2017. The student will work on a fully-funded project designed to understand the influences of urbanization on barred owls in the upstate of South Carolina and human perceptions of wildlife at the urban-rural interface. Drs. Rob Baldwin (Chair, Lloyd-SmartState Endowment in Urban Ecology and Restoration) and Pat Jodice (Unit Leader, USGS South Carolina Cooperative Research Unit) are project collaborators.

Qualifications: The successful applicant will be motivated and have a proven ability to generate high-quality work in an unsupervised environment. S/he should have excellent writing and communication skills and an interest in working cooperatively. Previous experience with field work is required and we are particularly interested in applicants with experience trapping and handling owls or other birds of prey. Minimum academic requirements are a BS degree in wildlife, biology, or related field, a 3.0 GPA, and a combined verbal + quantitative GRE score of 310.

To apply please submit (1) a cover letter explaining your interest in the position and your qualifications, and (2) a CV. Please be sure to include your GPA (undergrad and graduate), GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references somewhere within your CV. Documents should be submitted via email to rbarre2@clemson.edu as a single PDF file with the subject heading =93owl MS application=94. Applications must be received by March 20, 2017 to receive full consideration.

Additional information about the Barrett Lab at Clemson can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/clemsonbarrettlab/. Clemson University is ranked nationally as a top-25 public university. Clemson is situated in the Piedmont of South Carolina, and offers easy access to many outdoor recreational opportunities. Please visit the University=92s website (www.clemson.edu) for more information. Clemson University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender, pregnancy, national origin, age, disability, veteran=92s status, genetic information or protected activity (e.g., opposition to prohibited discrimination or participation in any complaint process, etc.) in employment, educational programs and activities, admissions and financial aid.  This includes a prohibition against sexual harassment and sexual violence as mandated by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Field technician for sagebrush vegetation monitoring

The University of Washington is advertising two positions to assist with vegetation monitoring from April-June 2017 in central WA as part of a multi-

agency project evaluating long-term vegetation dynamics in the sagebrush-

steppe. The project is a collaboration between the University of Washington, The Ohio State University, Department of Defense, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Fieldwork will take place in and around the Yakima Training Center and the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (Hanford Reach National Monument). The position is best suited to mature, upper-level undergraduates or recent graduates who are considering advanced study or professional work in plant ecology or range management. Details on the position, requirements, and application instructions are available here:

http://blogs.uw.edu/ecolsage/files/2016/12/Technician_position_description_d

raft_170214.pdf

Job Posting Northern California Summer Field Technicians

Based in Susanville, CA

Working in Lassen and Modoc Counties (primarily)

These positions (2-3 positions available) will provide technical field assistance for a team of UC Cooperative Extension Advisors and UC Cooperative Extension Specialists (UC Davis) on multiple ongoing research projects in Lassen and Modoc counties, including:

*         Post-fire grazing management of intermountain rangelands. Evaluate post-fire grazing management and other associated land treatments on long-term effects on rangeland health.

*         Assessment of seeding and rangeland restoration practices in the intermountain and Great Basin regions of northeastern California. Evaluating effects of site characteristics, weather variables, and seeding methods on current plant community metrics and wildlife habitat values.

*         Assessing effectiveness of juniper control treatments and understanding site effects, treatment methods, and time-scale on subsequent habitat values for sage grouse and other sage brush affiliated species.

Responsibilities

*         Conduct plant surveys, rangeland health monitoring protocols, and photo plots

*         Collect various types of data including GPS data

*         Enter data and perform data management

*         Work under close or infrequent supervision

Technical requirements

*         Completed or pursuing Bachelor’s Degree in Biological Sciences, such as Range Management, Natural Resources Management, Agriculture, or a related subject

*         Course work in plant taxonomy or experience identifying plants in the field using a dichotomous key and/or ability to quickly learn native and invasive plants of the sampling area and associated natural resource issues

*         Familiarity with or ability to quickly learn vegetation sampling methods including line point intercept and nested frequency

*         Experience navigating and collecting coordinates with hand-held GPS units, performing basic functions with GIS software (ArcMap), and navigation using topographic maps to locate plot locations in remote rangeland settings

*         Experience with Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Access)

Additional requirements

*         Ability to work in remote, harsh and rapidly changing environments, work in all types of weather conditions, traverse uneven terrain, carry upwards of 30 pounds in a backpack, and otherwise maintain good physical condition

*         Experience in and willingness to spend multiple days camping in the field

*         Provide personal camping equipment including but not limited to sleeping bag, tent, backpack, water bottle, hiking boots, utensils

*         Willingness to work irregular hours (e.g., early mornings, late nights)

*         Valid, state-issued driver’s license and clean driving record

*         Experience operating 4WD vehicles on paved and unpaved roads, often in narrow or rocky areas

*         Ability to operate an ATV over uneven rocky terrain

*         Ability to work productively as part of a team, as well as independently under general direction to accomplish team goals

*         Ability to communicate effectively with team members

*         Excellent organizational skills

Job Details

*         2-3 positions available

*         Position is based on an approximately 40 hour week with irregular work hours and schedule

*         Preferred starting date May 15 through August 19 (dates partially flexible)

*         This is an hourly paid internship ($12.86 – $17.86)

*         Possible shared summer housing available (~$180/month)

To Apply

Go to: http://ucanr.edu/Jobs/Jobs_990/?jobnum=3D1120 (for current students)

Go to: http://ucanr.edu/Jobs/Jobs_990/?jobnum=3D1144 (for non-students)

For questions please contact Laura Snell at lksnell@ucanr.edu<mailto:lksnell@ucanr.edu>

or David Lile at dflile@ucanr.edu<mailto:dflile@ucanr.edu>

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age, protected veteran status or other protected categories covered by the UC nondiscrimination policy.

Graduate position: USouthernMississippi.FishPopulationGenomics

A graduate assistant position (M.S. or Ph.D) is available in our
laboratory to work on population genetics/genomics of reef
fishes exploited in the Gulf of Mexico region. Current lab
projects include exploitation of RAD-Tag sequencing data to generate
linkage maps and/or analyze spatial genetic variation and population
structure with application to the management of aquaculture programs
and fisheries conservation.

The successful applicant will be provided a 12-month full-time Research
Assistantship with a tuition waiver. Candidates should possess a
Bachelor’s degree in a relevant field (e.g. Biology, Ecology &
evolutionary biology, Fisheries science, GPA > 3.5) when applying for
this position. Skills in programming/script-writing and experience with
molecular techniques are strong assets. The position is available
starting fall 2017.

Interested individuals should send a CV, GRE scores, and unofficial
transcripts to:

Eric Saillant, Ph.D
Associate Professor
Department of Coastal Sciences
The University of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast Research Laboratory
703 East Beach Drive
Ocean Springs, MS, 39564
Tel. (1) 228-818-8007
Fax (1) 228-872-4204
E-mail: eric.saillant@usm.edu

Eric Saillant <eric.saillant@usm.edu>

Graduate position:U_Pittsburgh.Evolutionary_Ecology

PhD positions in Evolutionary Ecology

The Turcotte Lab at the University of Pittsburgh is looking for PhD students to experimentally test the dynamic interplay between rapid evolution and community ecology in the field. Using various plant and insect study systems and complementary approaches, including experimental evolution, modeling, and genetic analyses, we test cutting-edge hypotheses in Evolutionary Ecology. We are especially interested in testing how rapid phenotypic changes, both plastic and evolutionary, impact concurrent ecological dynamics and species interactions. The aim of the lab is to disentangle and quantify how ecological and evolutionary processes reciprocally impact each other and understand their importance in nature.

Please visit the lab webpage for more information:        www.martinturcotte.net

The University of Pittsburgh is a leading research university and the Department of Biological Sciences is a dynamic and growing team of enthusiastic researchers and educators. The department also runs the Pymatuning Lab of Ecology, which is equipped with lab space and housing to facilitate field-based research in northwestern Pennsylvania. The City of Pittsburgh is a vibrant and beautiful place to live. It is often voted the ‘Most Livable city in the U.S.’. All graduate students in the department are provided with a competitive stipend and benefits for 5 years through a combination of fellowships, TAships, and research assistantships. Although funding from the lab itself is available, I expect all prospective students to apply for external funding.

Prospective students should email me  (turcotte@pitt.edu) with a short paragraph stating why you are interested in the lab and describe your past research experience. Please include your C.V., any publications, and contact information for a few references.

Martin Turcotte, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences
University of Pittsburgh

www.martinturcotte.net
turcotte@pitt.edu

Position Available: Roads Monitoring and Restoration AmeriCorps Intern

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=3DECOLO=

G&req=3D2017-ACI-001

In cooperation with The National Park Service and Lake Mead National

Recreation Area (NRA), the Great Basin Institute is recruiting a Roads

Monitoring and Restoration Intern. The Intern will support roads monitoring

and restoration of disturbances within Lake Mead NRA.  The Intern will be

responsible for assisting our Roads Specialist with reporting and managing

conditions along backcountry roads.  The Intern will assist with the

management of the division=E2=80=99s backcountry road condition reporting s=

ystem

and database and will assess and report off-road activities and

disturbances, including road barrier conditions, missing or damaged signs,

desert dumping, graffiti, and road conditions.  Work will include the use

of a GPS unit and camera to document disturbances and restoration actions

performed.  The Intern will work to restore off-road tracks using

hand-tools such as rakes and McLeods; remove graffiti using chemical

remover, chisels, and brushes; and install or repair barriers and signs

using necessary tools and equipment. For certain backcountry disturbance

projects, the Intern may help install plants, watering tubes, or rodent

cages.  The Intern will be responsible for assisting with backcountry data

management including GIS, Access, and photo data.  The Intern will also be

responsible for helping to manage the backcountry road monitoring volunteer

program including work schedules and data collection.

Other duties may consist of checking backcountry traffic counters, checking

weather stations, picking-up trash. This position will also support

operations at the Lake Mead native plant nursery which includes irrigation

setup and repair, plant propagation, seed collection and processing, weed

removal, and plant plot monitoring.

Compensation and Timeline:

o Living Allowance: $18,700 (allocated biweekly)

o Education Award: $5,775 (May be used for past, present or future

educational expenses, including payment of qualifying federal student loans=

)

o No-cost medical, dental and vision benefits provided

o January 2017-December 2017, full time, 40 hours per week including

occasional holidays and weekends

Location:

o Lake Mead NRA (Boulder City, NV).  Lake Mead National Recreation area is

located in the Mojave Desert so Intern will be required to wear appropriate

attire to work in an outdoor setting in extreme weather conditions and very

little shade.  Outside temperatures can range from below 32=C2=B0F in the w=

inter

to over 120=C2=B0 in the summer. Intern may be exposed to poisonous or

irritating plants that may cause skin irritations. Intern may come in

contact with spiders, lizards, scorpions, insects, and other hazardous

wildlife. Intern will be required to wear all necessary safety equipment to

perform duties.  Work will occur in remote areas on uneven terrain and

various elevation gains. Intern may be exposed to direct sun, wind, dust,

and rain.

Physical Demands

o Lift up to 50  pounds of material or power equipment;

o Bend, lift, pull, and push;

o Crouch, stoop, kneel, stand, or bend for long periods of time ;

o Walk for long periods of time on uneven surfaces carrying equipment; and

o Be outside in extreme heat or cold (depending upon the season).

Qualifications:

o Bachelor=E2=80=99s degree in recreation/wilderness management, natural re=

sources,

or related field desired;

o Ability to drive 4×4 vehicle, and navigate in the backcountry using maps

and GPS units;

o Ability to use ArcGIS software such as ArcMap, ArcCatalog, ArcToolbox,

ArcMobile, and ArcPad;

o Ability to use GPS units such as Garmins, Mesas, and Trimbles to collect

data;

o Ability to use Microsoft Office Programs;

o Ability to do physical labor in the backcountry;

o Motivated to learn about the park=E2=80=99s resources;

o Ability to communicate with park staff in an appropriate manner in

written and verbal form;

o Must pass a federal background check; and

o Meet AmeriCorps eligibility requirements: (1) U.S. citizenship or legal

resident alien status, (2) eligible to receive an AmeriCorps Education

Award (limit of four in a lifetime or the equivalent of two full-time

education awards), (3) pass National Sex Offender Public Website (NSOPW)

and federal criminal background checks, (4) adhere to the rules,

regulations and code of conduct as specified in the Member Service

Agreement; and (5) not engage in any prohibited activities as listed in the

Member Service Agreement.

How to Apply:

Please follow this link to apply directly through our online portal:

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=3DECOLO=

G&req=3D2017-ACI-001

We conform to all the laws, statutes, and regulations concerning equal

employment opportunities and affirmative action. We strongly encourage

women, minorities, individuals with disabilities and veterans to apply to

all of our job openings. We are an equal opportunity employer and all

qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without

regard to race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender

identity, or national origin, age, disability status, Genetic Information &

Testing, Family & Medical Leave, protected veteran status, or any other

characteristic protected by law. We prohibit Retaliation against

individuals who bring forth any complaint, orally or in writing, to the

employer or the government, or against any individuals who assist or

participate in the investigation of any complaint or otherwise oppose

discrimination.

Positions Available: Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Outreach Lead and Technicians

For complete position descriptions and to apply, follow the links below.

*Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Outreach Lead Internship*

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=ECOLOG&req=2017-ACI-004

Working collaboratively with Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA),

the Great Basin Institute is recruiting a lead intern to learn about and

participate on multiple projects including resource management and

education at LMNRA. During the main boating season (May-September), the

intern will lead a team in educating the boating public about aquatic

invasive species (AIS) and water safety, as well as gain skills and

knowledge of natural and cultural resources in the LMNRA.

This position is assigned to the Lake Mead National Recreation Area

(Kathrine Landing). This position will be performing a variety of duties

including (1) facilitating visitor contacts to create understanding of park

resources, aquatic invasive species, and boater safety and responsibility;

(2) collecting data on water quality (e.g., water sampling); and (3)

encourage visitors behavior to uphold the mission of the National Park

Service.

*Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Outreach Interns*

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=ECOLOG&req=2017-ACI-005

Working collaboratively with Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA),

the Great Basin Institute is recruiting interns to learn about and

participate on multiple projects including resource management and

education at LMNRA. During the main boating season (May-September), the

intern will educate the boating public about aquatic invasive species (AIS)

and water safety, as well as gain skills and knowledge of natural and

cultural resources in the LMNRA.

This position is assigned to the Lake Mead National Recreation Area

(Kathrine Landing). This position will be performing a variety of duties

including (1) facilitating visitor contacts to create understanding of park

resources, aquatic invasive species, and boater safety and responsibility;

(2) collecting data on water quality (e.g., water sampling); and (3)

encourage visitors behavior to uphold the mission of the National Park

Service.

Job: Wetland Field Technician, Wisconsin

Position: Seasonal Field Technician =96 2 positions

Employer: University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resour=

ces

Classification: Wildlife Technician (90660)

Duration: March 2017 =96 July 2017

Pay range: $12.00/hr

Work Location: Stevens Point, WI (will travel to Columbia, Dodge, Fond du=

Lac and Winnebago counties)

Position Description: The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is seekin=

g a

seasonal wetland field technician to assist with a project examining

water-bird abundance and ecological functioning of wetlands and their

adjacent uplands in the Glacial Habitat Restoration Area (GHRA) of

Wisconsin. Selected wetlands will occur on state, federal and private lan=

ds.

Technicians will report to Stevens Point, WI but extensive independent

travel to the GHRA will be required. Main duties will include following

secretive marshbird protocols (call-response surveys), conducting visual

surveys of waterfowl pairs and broods, identifying other wetland dependen=

t

birds (point counts), and taking various measurements to assess wetland

condition (including wetland rapid assessment methods). Other duties will=

include recording and managing data, data entry, contacting landowners,

driving university vehicles, and interaction with state and federal

conversation partners.

Department/University Description: Through the discovery and disseminatio=

n

of knowledge, UW-Stevens Point stimulates intellectual growth, provides a=

liberal education, and prepares students for a diverse sustainable word. =

The

university is committed to creating a safe, inclusive learning community =

for

all faculty and staff from a variety of backgrounds. Visit www.uwsp.edu f=

or

more information about UW-Stevens Point.

Qualifications:

Required:

-Course work in or completed B.S. degree in wildlife science, natural

resources, or a related field

-Ability to work in adverse conditions such as cold temperatures, snow an=

d

ice, difficult terrain insects, walking miles in waders, irritating plant=

s, etc.

-Strong work ethic

-Interpersonal skills

-Ability to work independently and with a partner or group for long hours=

Preferred:

– Previous field experience identifying wetland dependent birds and wetla=

nd

plants

– Previous field experience working in wetlands and/or working long shift=

s

– Previous field experience with ATVs

-A satisfactory driving record as defined by UW-Stevens Point Transportat=

ion

Services policy 6.1-6.3

(an unsatisfactory record includes, but is not limited to three or more

moving violations and/or at-fault accidents in the past two years, an

Operation While Intoxicated (OWI)/Driving Under the Influence (DUI) citat=

ion

within 12 months, or suspension or revocation of driver=92s license)

Appointment Date: March 15, 2017 or shortly thereafter

Terms of Employment: This position will require frequent, independent tra=

vel

and the ability to pass a driving record check as prescribed by UW System=

Administrative Policy 615 is required. Applicants must be able to pass a

background check, and exhibit a willingness to work an unpredictable sche=

dule.

Deadline: End of the day, 11:59pm, February 28, 2017. Review will begin

March 1, 2017.

Files must be complete to be considered. Submission in PDF format is

preferred for all attachments. Please include the following documents:

– Cover letter addressing qualifications and experience (please reference=

WI

GHRA Project in the subject line)

– Resume

– Names and contact information for three (3) professional references

To Apply:

Step 1: Please select the applicable link below:

External Applicants: (NOT currently employed by the University of Wiscons=

in

System)

https://www.careers.wisconsin.edu/psc/careers/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HR=

S_CE.GBL?&

MS Positions in Marine Physiology and Behavior

MS in Biology: The Chabot lab at Plymouth State University is seeking graduate students to fill two funded positions to study the behavior and physiology of horseshoe crabs and other estuarine organisms. Successful candidates will have the opportunity to engage in ongoing funded research=

into the effects of biomedical bleeding and the molecular and physiological control of biological rhythms of horseshoe crabs and other marine species in the lab and field.  Lab work might involve behavioral and physiological measurements, deep sequencing, bioinformatics, westerns=

, in situ, PCR, or immunohistochemistry, while field work will include collection trips and surveys.  The positions include research assistantships and tuition coverage. Research and course work will take place in beautiful Plymouth, NH located in the White Mountains and Lakes Region of New Hampshire as well as on and around Great Bay, NH. Expected outcomes include co-authorship in peer-reviewed scientific papers, presentations, preparation of grant proposals, and preparation for PhD program or positions in your field of interest.

If you are interested in applying for these positions, please send (1) a short introductory email stating your research/career interests, (2) C.V.=

; (3) unofficial transcripts; (4) copies of your GRE scores (if taken); and=

(5) a list of three references who are willing to write letters on your behalf as a single PDF file to Chris Chabot (chrisc@plymouth.edu). Applicants must have a Bachelor=92s degree in Biology or related field. Preference will be given to those who can begin in May or June, 2017. Review of applicants will begin immediately. Official transcripts and GRE=

scores will be required for admittance into PSU.

Summer Course on Invasion Biology at Friday Harbor Laboratories

July 17 – August 18, 2017 (5 weeks) Instructors:

Dr. Daniel Simberloff

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

University of Tennessee

tebo@utk.edu

Dr. Christy Leppanen

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

University of Tennessee

cleppane@utk.edu

Thousands of species of plants, animals, fungi, and microbes have been

transported by humans to new locations. Yes, without human assistance,

species have always managed to spread, but much less often, much more

slowly, and not nearly so far. This geographic rearrangement of the earth=

‘s

biota is one of the great global changes now underway. Although many

introduced species fail to establish populations or remain restricted to =

the

immediate vicinity of the new sites they land in, other species establish=

populations and invade new habitats, spreading widely and sometimes well

beyond the initial point of introduction.

Many invasions have such idiosyncratic and bizarre effects that they cann=

ot

fail to arouse our curiosity simply as fascinating tales of natural histo=

ry.

For example, who would have thought that=85

=95 Introducing kokanee salmon to Flathead Lake, Montana, and many years

later, opossum shrimp to three nearby lakes would ultimately have led to

population crashes of grizzly bears and bald eagles through a complicated=

chain reaction? =95 Introducing myxoma virus to Great Britain to control introduced rabbi=

t

populations would have led to the extinction of the large blue butterfly =

there? =95 Introducing a particular grass species would lead to hybridization wi=

th a

native congener, subsequent polyploidization, and the origin of a new

vigorous invasive species that would change entire intertidal systems?

Teasing apart such intriguing causal chains is a scientific accomplishmen=

t

of the first order. The variety and idiosyncrasy of effects challenges

biologists to produce general laws or rules to be able to explain why som=

e

introductions have no major impacts, while others lead to huge invasions.=

Being able to predict which species will fall in the latter category if

introduced, and which in the former, is the elusive holy grail of invasio=

n

biology.

Schedule: Class meets daily, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm. Some Saturday activities=

may be planned to accommodate fieldwork. Lectures/discussions/debates,

laboratory/field work, and individual/group activities will each comprise=

approximately 1/3 of the course meeting time, with the percentage of lect=

ure

decreasing and discussions and practical activities increasing as the cou=

rse

progresses.

Application Web Site:

http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/studentApplicationInfo.html

Although the deadline has passed, applications will be accepted for the n=

ext

three weeks

Financial Aid Available

For more information contact the instructors or Dr. Megan Dethier, Friday=

Harbor Laboratories mdethier@uw.edu

Position: Summer Research Assistant – Lake Warming (OPP)

*Position Summary:*

The Ecosystems Center of the Marine Biological Laboratory is seeking

applicants for a summer field assistant positions on a lake warming

project. The positions will largely be located at the Toolik Field

Station in northern Alaska. For additional information about the

Ecosystems Center and its programs, visit our web site at

http://ecosystems.mbl.edu/.

**

*Additional Information:*

This position will involve sampling lakes for a variety of routine and

non-routine limnological parameters, including benthic production and

benthic and pelagic nitrogen fixation. In addition the successful

candidate should be familiar with basic data analysis, and some

laboratory chemistry. The successful applicant will work under the

supervision of one or more senior project collaborators.

**

*Basic Qualifications:*

Applicants must be college graduates (BS or MS), with significant course

work and/or field experience in ecology.

**

*Preferred Qualifications:*

Some background aquatic ecology, hydrology, chemistry, or ecosystems

ecology preferred. Attention to detail and a desire to learn new

laboratory and field techniques are essential. A candidate with previous

experience using a gas chromatograph is preferred. Previous experience

with boats and other limnological gear is useful but not required.

**

*Physical Requirements:*

Applicants should be in good health, capable of rigorous outdoor

activity, and prepared to live in a field camp where cooperation with

others is essential, personal privacy is limited, and living

accommodations are spare and simple. Candidates for these jobs should be

available to live at Toolik Field Station for 3-4 months during June,

July August and September. Travel to Toolik Field Station is paid for by

the grant as well as the cost of room and board at the station and a salary.

**

*Special Instructions to Applicants:*

Required application documents include:

1) Cover Letter

2) Resume/CV

3) Name and contact information of 3 references

4) Copy of unofficial transcripts

APPLY ONLINE: https://mbl.simplehire.com

The Marine Biological Laboratory is an

Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity / Disabled / Veterans Employer.

Fish Swimming Course – Summer 2017- Friday Harbor Labs

Summer course on Fish Swimming at Friday Harbor Laboratories

Title of the course: “FISH SWIMMING: Kinematics, Ecomorphology,

Behavior & Environmental Physiology”. A Summer course for graduate

students (Masters and PhD) and post-docs  to be held at Friday Harbor

Laboratories (FHL, USA) (July 17th to August 18th 2017). (FHL 528, 9

credits)

Instructors: Dr. Paolo Domenici (CNR, Italian National Research

Council, Italy) and Dr. John F. Steffensen (University of Copenhagen,

Denmark).

Scope: Fish swimming is a multidisciplinary area of research that

encompasses biomechanics, physiology, energetics, ecology and

behavior. Knowledge of fish swimming is relevant both for students

interested in mechanisms of locomotion, and those interested in

locomotor adaptations to the environment.

Subjects and techniques: The main subjects will be 1)the kinematics

and performance of swimming in fish using various locomotory modes, 2)

the ecomorphology of fish locomotion, 3)locomotor strategies, 4)

metabolic aspects of fish swimming, and 5)the effect of various

environmental factors on fish swimming. These topics will be treated

in lectures and laboratory sessions. Students will learn techniques of

video analysis, kinematics, energetics and respirometry.

Lectures and lab work: The first half of the course will have an

emphasis on lectures and explanations of techniques for studying fish

swimming in the laboratory. In the second half of the course, emphasis

will be placed on laboratory work. Students will pursue independent

research projects. Enrollment will be limited to 15 graduate students

or postdocs. Here is a list of published papers carried out by

students during the course in previous years:

http://www.mbl.ku.dk/JFSteffensen/fhl/publications-fhl.htm

Tuition fees and financial aid: FHL offers financial aid to applicants

from any country. FHL has recently lowered the tuition fees for summer

courses. General information for applicants (including tuition and

financial aid, room and board) can be found at:

http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/studentSummer2017.html#SumB-3

Deadline: Applications will be accepted until February 20th 2017 or

later, if space is available.

Contact: For additional information contact: paolo.domenici@cnr.it or

jfsteffensen@bio.ku.dk

Field courses at Reelfoot Lake Environmental Field Station

The University of Tennessee at Martin=92s Reelfoot Lake Environmental Field Station is happy to announce its 2017 Maymester/Summer field courses.  Anyone interested in enrolling in courses should contact Dr. Tom Blanchard at tblanch@utm.edu.  Visit www.utm.edu/departments/reelfoot/ for application form and more information about the field station.

2017 Maymester and Summer Course Schedule:

Field Herpetology (ZOOL 327/527) =96 3 semester hours) Course schedule:  May 15-June 2 (Monday=96Thursday for week 1 and 2, Tuesday =96 Friday for week 3) Daily meeting time: 9 am =96 12 noon and 1:30 pm =96 4:30 pm

Instructor:=09Dr. Tom Blanchard  (University of Tennessee at Martin) e-mail:=09=09tblanch@utm.edu

phone:=09=09(731) 881-7594

The Reelfoot Lake area provides a great variety of aquatic and terrestrial habitats that supports a diverse assemblage of amphibians and reptiles.  The lake itself is a relatively shallow, natural lake with abundant emergent and submerged vegetation and extensive areas of periodically flooded cypress forests. The loess bluffs that are to the east and south of Reelfoot Lake offer upland habitat unlike that which is found throughout most of northwest Tennessee.  This course offers a great opportunity to observe a number of amphibian and reptile species in their natural habitats. The course will focus on the basic ecology of amphibians and reptiles, common techniques used to capture, handle, and mark various species, and the analysis of ecological data.  Each day will include a 1 =96 2 hr. lecture, followed by field trips to different habitats around the Reelfoot Lake area.  Night-time sampling will be a common activity during this course.  Prerequisites: introductory biology (BIO 130 and 140) or instructor=92s approval.

Aquatic and Wetland Plants (ZOOL 306/506=96 3 semester hours)

Course schedule: June 5-June 28 (Tues., Thurs., alternate Frid., Full day)

Daily meeting time: 9 am =96 12 noon, 1:30 pm =96 4:30 pm) Instructor:=09  Dr. Ron Jones (Eastern Kentucky University)

e-mail:=09=09  Ron.Jones@EKU.EDU Aquatic and Wetland plants is a field-oriented course designed to introduce students to the biology, ecology, and taxonomy of aquatic and wetland plants, with an emphasis on sight recognition and identification of species using diagnostic keys. The course includes field trips to various aquatic and wetland habitats around the Reelfoot Lake area where students will collect plant material that will then be identified through the use of keys. Students will also learn how to dry and preserve plant specimens for the herbarium. Some brief coverage of aquatic and wetland plant adaptations and the biological classification of hydrophytes will be developed in lectures. As many private, state, and federal agencies are interested in hiring people with plant identification skills, this course may be of particular interest to students planning to pursue careers in wetland consulting or rare species biology, as well as in other areas of environmental biology or ecology. This course requires field work involving physical activities such as hiking, wading and canoeing. Prerequisites: introductory biology (BIO 130 and 140) or instructor=92s approval.=20

Survey Techniques for Mammal Conservation  (BIOL462/BIOL720  Special Topics =96 3 semester hours) Meeting time:=09June 8 =96 July 7 (Thursdays 5 pm -11pm; Fridays 8am =96 =

2pm )

Instructor:=09Dr. Nancy Buschhaus (University of Tennessee at Martin)

e-mail:=09=09nbuschha@utm.edu

phone:=09=09(731) 881-7177

Looking for experience with a variety of live capture techniques for non-game mammals?  Want to know more about the practical application of conservation biology in the field?  This course will examine several different techniques for observing mammals, the advantages and disadvantages of each, some of the mathematical and statistical mechanisms for interpreting data collected from these techniques, as well discuss the framework of the biological aspects of conservation biology associated with non-game mammal species.  As a part of the course, we will learn to: eliminate some of the biases associated with field surveys of mammals, set up and monitor small mammal trapping grids, deploy and interpret wildlife camera =93traps=94, recognize the us=

es of radiotelemetry and PIT tags, record and identify bat calls, mist net bats and apply WNS decontamination protocols, establish behavioral sampling techniques, recognize the importance of habitat and life history characteristics on our ability to survey mammals, identify the mammals we capture and learn their basic taxonomy, and apply population level analyses and inferential statistical techniques to some of the data that we accumulate (e.g. maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), occupancy models, the effects of false positives and false negatives, etc.).  All meeting times for the course are required.  We will be out in the field most of the class time on Thursday evenings and some of the class time on Friday mornings.  We will spend the rest of the time on Fridays learning in-class application of the data we collect, as well as lecture information regarding the basics of conservation biology as it applies to mammals.  On Thursday evenings (and some Friday mornings), we will be in and next to a large wetland, mostly in the dark, in the summer, requiring the willingness to participate in extensive field work involving hiking in and around the high-humidity habitats near the shore of Reelfoot Lake and other semi-aquatic regions in the area. Prerequisites: introductory biology (BIOL 130-140) or instructor=92s approval.

Doctoral Assistantship in Undergraduate STEM Teaching and Learning

Please see below and attached a doctoral assistantship opportunity

co-funded by UNL/UNO with an emphasis on undergraduate teaching and

learning, faculty development, and science literacy.  Please share as

appropriate.  Thanks in advance!

Jenny

Seeking: Ph.D. Student in Undergraduate STEM Teaching and

Learning/Discipline-Based Education Research

University of Nebraska-Lincoln/University of Nebraska at Omaha

Objective: To engage in discipline-based education research to investigate

STEM teaching and learning as part of grant-supported projects.

Description:

The School of Natural Resources (UNL) and Department of Biology (UNO) seek

a Ph.D. candidate to participate in grant-funded projects to investigate

i.) undergraduate student learning outcomes in STEM, and ii.) design and

assess professional development opportunities for undergraduate STEM

instructors (e.g., faculty and learning assistants at the undergraduate and

master=E2=80=99s level). Position includes a stipend, health insurance, and=

tuition

remission.  The planned start date for the position is August 20, 2017.

The position is initially established for a period of one year.

Continuation of this position beyond one year is contingent upon

satisfactory performance of assigned duties and available funding.  Review

of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position

is filled.

Essential Duties:

The successful candidate will have a strong desire to investigate

undergraduate STEM teaching and learning through STEM education

research/DBER. The participant will work with PIs at two institutions in

Nebraska to assess faculty development opportunities, professional

development for M.S.-level students, and establish infrastructure for

instructor training interventions on a large scale. At UNL, the Excellence

in Education for Food, Energy, and Water (E2FEW) project, recently funded

by USDA-NIFA, will support the development, implementation, and evaluation

of a 24-month sustained professional development program for STEM faculty.

At UNO, funding from three major agencies will support the candidate=E2=80=

=99s work

in program assessment of professional development programs for

undergraduates in life sciences and pre-service teachers. Across these

projects, the applicant will conduct data collection, analysis, and

dissemination of his/her work on a national or international scale.

Preferred Experience and Training:

Prior experience in research as an undergraduate and/or masters candidate

is preferred. Established productivity in education research design and

methods (quantitative, qualitative, mixed). B.S. required, M.S. strongly

preferred. Prior experience working with K-16 students is desirable.

Moreover, competitive applicants will have a demonstrated history of

collaborative work and effective communication skills (both written and

orally).

Please submit inquiries about the position to Dr. Cory Forbes (

cory.forbes@unl.edu) and Dr. Christine Cutucache (ccutucache@unomaha.edu).

To apply, applicants should email a letter of interest describing their

background, interest, qualifications, and future goals, a resume/curriculum

vitae, 2 writing samples, and names of 3 references to Drs. Cutucache and

Forbes via email.

Position Justification:

Two Universities in the state of Nebraska have active STEM learning

investigations taking place with several projects being externally funded.

These projects center around student learning outcomes in the life

sciences. Consequently, there is a vacancy for a graduate research

assistant to address research questions in this area and have the ability

to work on several projects and contribute to high quality products.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies-Project Assistant Opportunities

The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY, is accepting applications for the following, Seasonal Project Assistant positions reporting to Dr. Richard S. Ostfeld:

Seasonal Project Assistants =93Mouse-mast Project=94 (up to 3): Job Number:

17002-I

Research the dynamics of mammalian communities and the relationships between mammals, ticks, oak trees, and Lyme disease.  Location is the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in New York=92s Hudson River Valley.  Duties include live-trapping small mammals, taking blood, urine, and fecal samples, reliably recording trapping data, sampling abundance of ticks, tree seed collection,and seedling surveys within eastern deciduous forest

plots. Early morning and late afternoon hours are required.  Prior experience handling small mammals is highly desirable.  Employment can begin as early as April 1 or as late as mid May, with an end date of approximately November 14, 2017.  Jobs are full time, 35 hours/week.  Wage is commensurate with education and experience.

The final candidate will be required to complete a post-offer, pre- employment screening and background check successfully.  On-site housing is available.  Posting is open until February 15, 2017 or until filled.

Please submit job application via http://www.caryinstitute.org/who-we-

are/jobs and include a single PDF file consisting of a letter of application, a resume, and the names, phone numbers, and email addresses of three professional references. Be sure to cite Job Number 17002-I =93Mouse-

mast Project=94.

Seasonal Project Assistants =93Tick-Climate Project=94 (up to 6): Job Number:=20

17003-I

Research the effects of weather and climate on the survival and behavior of blacklegged ticks and risk of tick-borne disease.  Location is the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in New York=92s Hudson River Valley, with travel to sites between northern New York and North Carolina.  Duties include maintaining lab colonies of mice and ticks, establishing and maintaining field plots with ticks, assessing and recording tick survival, and downloading data from dataloggers. Meticulous attention to detail and

experience in field ecology is mandatory.  Prior experience handling small mammals is highly desirable.  Employment to begin between March 15 and May=20

1, with an end date of approximately September 30, 2017.  Jobs are full time, 35 hours/week.  Wage is commensurate with education and experience.

The final candidate will be required to complete a post-offer, pre- employment screening and background check successfully. On-site or nearby

housing is available.  Posting is open until February 15, 2017 or until filled.

Please submit job application via http http://www.caryinstitute.org/who-we-

are/jobs and include a single PDF file consisting of a letter of application, a resume, and the names, phone numbers, and email addresses of three professional references. Be sure to cite Job Number 17003-I =93Climate-

Tick Project=94.

Seasonal Project Assistants =93The Tick Project=94 (up to 12): Job Reference #17004-I

Research the effects of tick management interventions on the survival and

behavior of blacklegged ticks and risk of tick-borne disease in people.

Location is the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in New York=92s Hudson River Valley, with travel to sites throughout Dutchess County, New York.

Duties include sampling and collecting ticks in suburban neighborhoods, live-trapping small mammals, gathering and entering data on tick encounters with local residents and cases of tick-borne disease, deploying and maintaining wildlife cameras. Meticulous attention to detail and experience in field ecology is mandatory.  Prior experience handling small mammals is highly desirable.  Employment to begin between April 1 and May 15, with an end date of approximately September 30, 2017.  Jobs are full time, 35 hours/week.  Wage is commensurate with education and experience.

The final candidate will be required to complete a post-offer, pre- employment screening and background check successfully.  On-site or nearby housing is available. Posting is open until February 15, 2017 or until filled.

Please submit job application via http://www.caryinstitute.org/who-we-

are/jobs and include a single PDF file consisting of a letter of application, a resume, and the names, phone numbers, and email addresses of three professional references. Be sure to cite Job Number 17004-I =93The Tick Project=94.

All Project Assistants will report to Dr. Richard S. Ostfeld.

The Cary Institute is an Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Affirmative  Action (AA) employer. It is the policy of the Company to provide equal employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, familial status, protected veteran or disabled status, or genetic information.

Internships/Research in Panama

The Azuero Earth Project is a rural nonprofit dedicated to reforestation,

tropical dry forest restoration, sustainable land management and environmental education on the Azuero peninsula of Panama. We currently seek interns and research collaborators in grassroots reforestation/conservation, wildlife research, environmental education, nonprofit management, environmental (bilingual) communications, graphic design, and environmental library science.  For more information on the organization, please email info@azueroearthproject.org.  To see more about our work in the field, see our social media networks (@proecoazuero on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook).=20

PhD position to study water stress indicators of riparian forest decline

Seeking a PhD student to work on a new NSF-funded project with field work  on a Southern California river (Santa Clara) plus dendro-isotope lab analyses.  Three years of funding minimum available, with additional years possible.

*PROJECT TITLE*

Linking basin-scale, stand-level, and individual tree water stress indica tors for groundwater-dependent riparian forests in multiple-use river basins

*THE POSITION AND HOW TO APPLY*

The PhD position is supported at SUNY-ESF, the State University of New Yo rk College of Environmental Science and Forestry, working with Dr. John Stella and interdisciplinary collaborators at UC Santa Barbara and The Nature Conser vancy. The position will start in fall 2017. Research questions will focus on ripari an ecosystem response to drought, climate change and groundwater extraction. Methods w ill include field sampling to inventory riparian forest structure and health, collect ing and analyzing tree rings for growth trends and annual water use efficiency using carbon  isotopes, and assessing critical thresholds for riparian forest decline. Field studies  will occur in the Santa Clara River basin in Southern California with lab work at SUNY-ESF  and partner institutions. Ideal candidates will have an MS in ecology, environmental  science, or a related field; a strong quantitative and statistical background; the abil ity to work in remote field settings; and interest in riparian forest ecology and tree e cophysiology in dryland regions. The position is funded for a minimum of three years and  provides a competitive stipend, tuition and benefits. Interested candidates should s end a CV/resume (with GPA and GRE scores), a description of research interests and experience, and names and contact information for 3 references to stella@ esf.edu. For more information on how to apply, see http://www.esf.edu/fnrm/stella/opportunities.html

*FULL PROJECT ABSTRACT*

Linking basin-scale, stand-level, and individual tree water stress indica tors for groundwater-dependent riparian forests in multiple-use river basins John Stella, SUNY-ESF (PI); Michael Singer, UCSB (PI); Dar Roberts, UCSB (Co-PI)

This project will develop a suite of water stress indicators at several s cales to assess the health of riparian ecosystems in response to sustained groundwater decline. Riparian forests and woodlands are hotspots of biodiversity and support k ey functions and habitats within river corridors, but they are particularly sensitive  to large changes in water supply. The study will take place in the Santa Clara River (Califor nia, USA), where sustained groundwater pumping for irrigation during a severe drought has  had negative impacts and allows for study of riparian woodland response to short- and long-term climate change. The project team will assess the signals and thresholds o f water stress over the last decade using high-resolution aerial imagery and tree-rings  to develop predictors of long-term impairment and collapse. This work addresses a to pic of urgent scientific and societal importance, namely how to assess and prevent nega tive impacts of drought and human-induced water shortages on vulnerable, high-value riparian ecosystems. In collaboration with The Nature Conservancy, the project tea m will integrate results within statewide guidelines for protecting groundwater-dependent riparian ecosystems mandated under California=92s recent Groundwater Sustainability Management Act. The project will engage the public in several ways, including: 1) consulting with groundwater managers, farmers and other stakeholders through workshops to develop effective methods for communicating results widely; (2) mentoring early career scientists including women in STEM subjects; and 3) engaging with K-12 student programs in diverse local communities to increase environmental awareness in the Santa Clara basin.

As water management in multiple-use river basins around the world becomes increasingly intertwined with large-scale ecosystem restoration, the prop osed research sits at the forefront of broader human-climate-ecosystem challenges facin g societies, businesses, and governments. The project will capitalize on extensive gro undwater well records to link water table dynamics with changes in plant water status d etected at two different scales: (1) basin-wide, high-resolution aerial imagery taken se asonally during the drought; and (2) annual growth and carbon isotope data from tree ring s covering the same period. The study is novel, in that it integrates advanced metho ds in two rapidly-emerging fields, hyperspectral remote sensing and isotope dendroe cology, in developing a holistic understanding of water stress at multiple scales of  resolution. The research is also potentially transformative in that it compares water str ess indicators that vary in their timing, strength, and rates of change, and that it ena bles the assessment of warning signs and time lags between reduced growth and func tioning in individual trees, and synoptic forest decline evident throughout a river  corridor. These findings will have broad application beyond the study system, because the  ecology and functional roles of riparian trees are similar in many water-limited regi ons, with similar foundational importance in groundwater-dependent ecosystems globally.

——————————

PhD position in invasive plant ecology, University of Wyoming

Project description:

The invasive plant ecology lab at the University of Wyoming is seeking a PhD level student to head a plant community restoration project. Restoration of the native plant community in areas once under energy development and other major disturbances is a difficult task that is often unsuccessful.  Therefore, this project aims to use novel reclamation strategies to transition disturbed areas into a suitable environment for native plant establishment.

You will have the opportunity to:

-=09Design and develop research related to invasive plant establishment during restoration/reclamation -=09Work directly with county, state, and federal agencies involved in invasive plant management

-=09Present results from this work to stakeholders throughout the region and other professionals nationally -=09Publish peer-reviewed scientific literature

Start date is negotiable; however, work is anticipated to start summer 2017.

Qualifications sought:

=09I am seeking a driven and curious student whom has interest in working closely with state and county agencies to develop better reclamation practices.  This student should also have interest in general ecology, invasion ecology, reclamation and/or invasive plant management and have previous research experience.  Projects will be field-based; therefore, this student should have previous field experience and a desire to work in potentially remote areas.  Significant travel across the state will be required to complete this project so prospective students must be willing to travel (i.e., valid driver’s license).

Application instructions:

=09Please submit in PDF form to Dr. Daniel Tekiela (dtekiela@uwyo.edu) 1) a CV, 2) three professional references, 3) a two- page cover letter describing how your past experience relates to this project and how you would benefit this project, and 4) college transcripts and GRE scores.  Please contact me with any further questions.

Additional information:

The University of Wyoming is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.  All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status or any other characteristic protected by law and University policy. To review the EEO is the Law Poster and its Supplement, please see The Diversity & Fairness page.

We conduct background investigations for all final candidates being considered for employment.  Offers of employment are contingent upon the completion of the background check.

Applicants with disabilities may request accommodation to complete the application and selection process. Please notify Human Resources at least three (3) working days prior to the date of need.

Laramie is a quaint college town with immense culture.  Laramie has multiple local historic sites, museums, social venues, and burgeoning downtown.  Most importantly, Laramie is also located within an hour of numerous outdoor activities including hiking, backpacking, biking, running, downhill skiing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, fishing, hunting, climbing, etc…

PhD Opportunity in Microbial Ecology and Soil Carbon Cycling

The Morrissey lab at West Virginia University is seeking a motivated Ph.D . student interested in researching microbial ecology and soil carbon cycling. Stud ents with experience in molecular biology, stable isotope probing, bioinformatics, biogeochemistry, and/or soil ecology are particularly encouraged to apply. If you are inte rested in this opportunity please contact Dr. Ember Morrissey and provide a brief descri ption of your research interests and career goals as well as a resume/CV highlighting a ny relevant coursework and experience. Potential students will apply to one of the gr aduate programs within the Davis School of Agriculture at WVU (http://grad.davis.wvu.edu/davis- doctoral-

programs). Lab website: http://morrisseyem.wixsite.com/morrisseywvu

Science Communications Internship

Smithsonian Bicoastal Science Communications Internship

Stipend: $500/week

Time: 18 weeks (April-August or May-September 2017)

Start Date: Flexible, between April 1 and May 15

Location: Edgewater, Md. and Tiburon, Calif.

Application Deadline: February 15, 2017, 11:59 p.m. PST

Description:

Gain hands-on experience with environmental communication on both sides of America! The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center is seeking an intern to work for 18 weeks, from April through August, covering the work of SERC researchers in Maryland and California. The intern will start at SERC’s Chesapeake Bay headquarters in the spring, getting training in SERC science communications. In the summer, the intern will travel to San Francisco Bay to cover the work of SERC marine biologists in California for the remaining 10 weeks. Travel funds from Maryland to California are included.

*         The intern will learn multiple facets of SERC communications, gaining experience in science writing, social media and Web design.

*         The intern will learn to interview scientists, shadowing them in the field and translating complex research into smart, exciting articles.

*         The intern will summarize her/his accomplishments in a public seminar at the end of the project period under the supervision of the communications coordinator.

*         The intern will gain professional development by attending monthly meetings on the National Mall with the other Smithsonian public information officers.

Spring (Part I): Chesapeake Bay

The intern will spend the first eight weeks at SERC’s headquarters in Edgewater, Md. There, the intern will interview SERC scientists in the field and the lab and write about their work. This first part of the internship will introduce the intern to the main features of SERC science communications: writing articles for the SERC Shorelines blog<http://sercblog.si.edu>, preparing posts for SERC’s social media and assisting in the production of SERC’s quarterly newsletter On The Edge, under the mentorship of SERC science writer Kristen Minogue.

Summer (Part II): San Francisco Bay

For the final 10 weeks, the intern will work in California, with the Tiburon section of SERC’s Marine Invasions Research Lab<https://serc.si.edu/labs/marine-invasions-research>. SERC’s Tiburon branch is hosted at the Romberg Tiburon Center<https://serc.si.edu/tiburon-research-branch>, a marine field station of San Francisco State University. SERC marine biologists in Tiburon work in San Francisco Bay and traverse the Pacific Coast studying invasive species, oyster restoration and other critical conservation issues. There, the intern will cover the work of SERC’s West Coast scientists while exploring and developing communication strategies within the Pacific market. During the California part of the internship, the intern will work under the onsite supervision of research ecologist Andrew Chang and correspond with Kristen Minogue via Skype.

Pre-Requisites:

Strong scientific background (natural sciences coursework; not required to be a science major) and skill writing about science for a nonscientific audience. Ability to use Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint) required; familiarity with photo editing software, WordPress and HTML a plus.

To apply:

Send a cover letter, resume with references (name, title and contact information) and unofficial transcript to ScienceWritingIntern@si.edu<mailto:ScienceWritingIntern@si.edu> by 11:59 PST February 15, 2017. One to three published or unpublished writing samples explaining science for general readers are also essential to include for the application to be considered. For more information visit http://serc.si.edu

JOB OPPORTUNITY: 2017 SEASONAL VEGETATION MONITORING TECHNICIANS

The Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) is currently seeking five (5) vegetation monitoring technicians for the upcoming 2017 summer field season to work in the Elko, NV District of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Located in Ely, Nevada, the ENLC is a non-profit conservation organization comprised of public, private, and non-profit partners dedicated to the restoration of Western ecosystems through collaborative teamwork.

Elko is located in the remote, northeastern corner of Nevada. The area has a unique blend of Northern Basin and Range and sage brush steppe attributes including beautiful expanses of sagebrush flats and many mountain ranges available for exploring and recreating. The rugged Ruby Mountains lie 20 miles to the southeast of Elko and offer unique hiking, backpacking, climbing, fishing and camping experiences. The city of Elko has a lively downtown area and hosts cultural events throughout the summer (including the International Basque festival, rodeos and the Ruby Mountain Relay).

VEGETATION MONITORING DUTIES: Field crews=92 primary responsibility will be to collect post-fire vegetative response data in burned areas on public lands managed by the BLM as part of the Emergency Stabilization and Rehabilitation (ES&R) program, primarily utilizing Assessment, Inventory and Monitoring (AIM) protocols. Data collected will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of post wildfire rehabilitation treatments. Technicians will be responsible for driving federal vehicles, hiking to sampling locations, following rigorous sampling protocols for vegetation data collection, data quality control and data entry.

EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE: Applicants should have graduated from a program in biological sciences, ecology, natural resources or other field or have prior working experience in natural resources. Experience in plant identification and a general knowledge of plant taxonomy is required. Applicants should be able to hike 2-10 miles a day while carrying a pack with field equipment, and be comfortable with truck camping in the backcountry for up to 8 days at a time in sometimes harsh weather conditions. Preferred applicants will be experienced with Microsoft Excel and Access, 4WD vehicles, GPS navigation, and have had a clean driving record for the past 3 years.

SALARY: $15-$16/hour, depending on experience (plus $34/day per diem when camping).

SCHEDULE:  Positions in the Elko District will begin in early May and continue through October (start and end dates may change based on weather conditions and work load). Work will occur on an 8-days-on/6-

days-off schedule (10-hour days).

Applicants should email a cover letter, resume, and the contact information for at least three references to Steph Frederick sfrederick@envlc.org. Materials must be emailed by Tuesday February 28, 2017. For more information, please visit our website (http://www.envlc.org) or email Steph. Please include =93Vegetation Monitoring Technician=94 in the email subject line.

JOB OPPORTUNITY: 2017 SEASONAL INVASIVE PLANT TECHNICIANS

The Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) is currently seeking four(4) invasive plant technicians to work in the Elko, NV District of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Located in Ely, Nevada, ENLC is a non-profit conservation organization comprised of public, private, and non-profit partners dedicated to the restoration of the Western ecosystems through collaborative teamwork.

Elko is located in the remote, northeastern corner of Nevada. The area has a unique blend of Northern Basin and Range and sage brush steppe attributes including beautiful expanses of sagebrush flats and many mountain ranges available for exploring and recreating. The rugged Ruby Mountains lie 20 miles to the southeast of Elko and offer unique hiking, backpacking, climbing, fishing and camping experiences. The city of Elko has a lively downtown area and hosts cultural events throughout the summer (including the International Basque festival, rodeos and the Ruby Mountain Relay).

INVASIVE PLANT TECHNICIAN DUTIES: Field crews will work with an experienced crew lead while assisting in inventory and management of invasive plants on public lands. Inventory duties include correctly identifying invasive plant species and infestations, surveying, recording and managing data. Invasive plant control will predominantly consist of herbicide application and manual control (hand pulling/hand tools). All technicians will be responsible for driving  large, federal pick-ups (often towing trailers), operating ATVs and UTVs and hiking to treatment/inventory sites. Technicians are also required to wear appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Some PPE (neoprene gloves, etc) will be provided by the BLM, but closed-toed shoes and long pants must be provided by applicant. Technicians must be comfortable with truck camping in the backcountry for up to 4 days at a time and MUST be physically able to hike while wearing a 40 lb. backpack sprayer over rough and steep terrain.

EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE: Qualified applicants should have experience and/or education in invasive plant management, biological sciences, natural resources, plant identification or general plant taxonomy and the ability to follow directions and safety protocols. Applicants must be experienced with 4WD vehicles and should have a clean driving record for the past 3 years. Experience with utilizing GPS units and programs (Trimble units and ArcPad) and ATVs/UTVs is a plus.

SALARY: $14-16/hour, depending on experience (plus $34/day per diem when camping)

SCHEDULE: Positions run from early May through the end of September and follow a 10-hour day/four-day work week. Crews will generally return to Elko in the evenings, though camping near a project site for 4 days at a time will be required for up to two pay periods.=20

Applicants should email a cover letter, resume, and the contact information for at least three references to Steph Frederick sfrederick@envlc.org. Materials must be emailed by Tuesday February 28, 2017. For more information, please visit our website (http://www.envlc.org) or email Steph. Please include =93Invasive Plant Technician=94 in the email subject line.

Summer plant biotech positions

The U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center is

seeking applicants for a total of five biological science technician

positions (emphasis on vegetation) in the northern Great Plains.  Three

positions will work on a rangeland assessment at Badlands National Park,

and two positions will participate in research on controlling invasive

annual brome grasses in two or more parks in South Dakota and Nebraska.

Only applicants who are 18 years or older and current students or recent

graduates (graduated within 12 months of the position=E2=80=99s end date,

Bachelor’s or Master’s level) are eligible for these positions.  Children

and spouses of current USGS employees are not eligible.

Pay ranges from $15.13-$20.96/hr, with duration of positions ranging from

~3 months (late May-mid August) to ~6 months (mid April – mid October),

depending on position.  All positions are full time (40 hr/week).

For details and information on how to apply, go to

http://wfscjobs.tamu.edu/jobs/biological-science-technician-plants-south-dakota-2/

and

http://wfscjobs.tamu.edu/jobs/biological-science-technician-plants-south-dakota/

Job Announcement: Forest Ecology Field Technicians (CA)

We are hiring field technicians to work at the Teakettle Experimental Forest. Teakettle is a 1300 ha old-growth, mixed-conifer forest 80 km east of Fresno, CA at 2200 m elevation in the Sierra Nevada. Duties will include, but are not limited to mapping forest structure and shrub cover using a surveyor=92s total station, basic tree measurements, and assisting visiting scientists with their projects as needed. These projects may include: basic soils work (coring, soil moisture, etc.), small mammal trapping, seedling inventories, understory plant surveys, soil respiration measurement, microclimate data collection and tree coring. Desired skills include plant identification, use of a total station, basic knowledge of tree measurements, and previous experience working as a crewmember. The facilities at Teakettle are rustic due to the remote location of the station. The cabin has solar power, bathrooms, kitchen and common space; individuals will spend the summer sleeping in tents. The nearest town for supplies is Shaver Lake, CA, approximately a 1-hour drive from the field station.

The pay is $14/hr. The field season will begin in mid-June and run through late August 2017. Transportation to the field location is the responsibility of the technician.

To apply please visit https://unmjobs.unm.edu/

Title:  Field Research Assistant=20=20 Posting Number:  0837551=20

If you have any questions regarding the application process, please email Marissa Goodwin at mjgoodwin@unm.edu

Job-avian research technicians Wyoming

Job Description

The University of Waterloo=92s Natural Gas Reclamation in the Sagebrush-

Steppe Project is seeking bird research technicians to assist with avian point counts, monitoring greater sage-grouse fitted with GPS backpack trackers, nest productivity monitoring (songbirds and sage-grouse), and vegetation sampling. The research will be conducted in large-scale natural gas reclamation areas in sagebrush habitat in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. The objective of this component of the research is to better understand the response of sagebrush obligate birds to landscape scale habitat reclamation. Lodging will be provided in Buffalo or Sheridan, Wyoming. The work term will be from 01 May to approx. 31 August 2017 (exact end dates are somewhat flexible).

Primary Duties

=95=09Conducting avian point-count surveys

=95=09Songbird nest searching and nest productivity monitoring

=95=09Greater sage-grouse monitoring and tracking

=95=09Microhabitat vegetation sampling

=95=09Data entry and data proofing

=95=09Operating 4×4 vehicles

=95=09Operating ATV=92s

Work will require long hours in the field in adverse weather condition, working alone and hiking long distances. Technicians must be able to work well with others, live side-by-side with coworkers and have good communication skills.

Qualifications

=95Completion or enrollment in, a college/university program in wildlife ecology/management, biology, zoology, or other natural resource related fields

=95Have the ability to legibly record field data and enter data into a computer (Excel, Word, etc.)

=95Understand the use of GPS equipment and basic navigation with a compass

=95Have experience conducting field work

=95Be willing to work long days ( > 8 hours) in the field and often 6 day weeks

=95Valid full driver=92s license

=95First Aid and CPR training

=95Previous work with songbirds and/or sage-grouse is a plus

=95Knowledge of songbird bird identification is a plus

=95Training or previous work using telemetry or tracking animals is a plus

Compensation

Technicians will be paid $1850 USD per month and housing will be provided. Technicians will be responsible for their own living expenses (e.g., food).

How to apply

If you are interested in joining the project and spending the summer near the Bighorn Mountains in Wyoming, please email a cover letter, resume, and at least two professional references to ckirol@uwaterloo.ca. The study area is ~ 30 miles east of Buffalo, Wyoming. Applications will be taken until 10 March 2017, or until the positions are filled. You can find project details at http://fedylab.uwaterloo.ca/.

Masters of Science in Environmental Studies program – UNC-Wilmington

The University of North Carolina Wilmington is currently recruiting for the

fall 2017 cohort in the Masters of Science in Environmental Studies program.

The non-thesis program is an exciting, interdisciplinary curriculum focusing

on linking classroom experience with hands-on fieldwork, culminating in a

semester-long internship/practicum with an environmentally-related

organization. Our program is both challenging and rewarding, with a high

degree of collegiality among students and faculty.

MS concentrations are available in:

-Coastal Management

-Environmental Conservation and Management

-Marine and Coastal Education

-Environmental Education and Interpretation

An Individualized Concentration is also available for those who wish to

design their own curriculum in conjunction with faculty.

For more information, and a link to application materials: http://www.uncw.edu/evs/graduate_programs.html. Be sure to watch our short video about the program with student

testimonials:

http://catalogue.uncw.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=3D40&poid=3D6798&returnto=3D5215

For more information about UNCW, feel free to see our University=92s web site:

www.uncw.edu.

The deadline for fall 2017 priority application is March 15, and our regular

deadline is April 15, 2017.

For questions or additional information, please feel free to contact me.

Best wishes,

Dr. James A. Rotenberg

Graduate Program Coordinator

email: rotenbergj@uncw.edu

MS position to study fire ecology of upland oak forests

I am seeking a highly motivated MS graduate student to join the Forest and

Fire Ecology research group in the Department of Forestry within the College

of Forest Resources at Mississippi State University (Starkville, MS). Research in our lab focuses on understanding forest response to changing

disturbance regimes in a variety of forest ecosystems, including

Mississippi, Kentucky, Texas, and Siberia. The student will conduct

extensive field research investigating the influence of fire on upland oak

forest regeneration and consequences of forest compositional shifts on

resource availability and forest flammability at a variety of sites,

including Bowen Farm (MS) and Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest (KY).

The student will be appointed as a Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) but

will act as a teaching assistant for an undergraduate course in Dendrology

and/or Ecology during two semesters. The student also will be expected to

assist other researchers in the lab with their projects.

Applicants must have a Bachelor’s degree in forestry, ecology, biology, or a

related field. Successful candidates must demonstrate an aptitude for

research, strong analytical and communication skills, attention to detail,

and ability to work independently. Prior experience in fieldwork related to

forest and ecosystem ecology is highly desired. Applicants must be in

excellent physical condition and capable of working long hours outdoors

exposed to harsh weather, biting insects, and thorny vegetation. The student

must have data analysis and scientific writing experience and a strong

desire to pursue these non-field related activities. Must also possess a

current and valid driver’s license.

If interested, please email to Dr. Heather Alexander

(heather.alexander@msstate.edu)  (1) a cover letter discussing interest in

the research, qualifications, and applicable background experience; (2) a

resume/CV; and (3) unofficial transcripts. Incomplete applications will not

be considered. Details on the full application process to the MSU Graduate

School can be found at http://www.grad.msstate.edu/prospective/. Financial

support is available for two years, starting in fall 2017, and includes a

stipend, tuition waiver, and health insurance. Review of applications will

begin on February 24, 2017.

Summer internship opportunties at Arizona Game and Fish Department

The Arizona Game and Fish Department offers paid summer internship opportunities in cooperation with participating college and universities. This is an excellent opportunity for students interested in gaining hands on practical work experience while working with a diverse group of professionals in the fields of wildlife science, biological science, wildlife management, and many other professions within the Department.

What is the Arizona Game and Fish Department?

The Arizona Game & Fish Department is responsible for managing Arizona’s fish and wildlife resource as an enduring public trust. In addition, the department is charged with promoting safe and responsible use of watercraft and off-highway vehicles. Funding is provided from the sale of licenses and permits; watercraft registration fees; federal excise taxes on firearms, fishing equipment, boats, and other sporting goods; state lottery revenues; donations on state income tax forms; and various contracts and grants. The Arizona Game and Fish Commission, whose five members are appointed by the governor, set department policy.

Internship guidelines & overview

The Arizona Game and Fish Department is seeking students to work during the summer to perform duties in the area of wildlife management. Students will perform duties under close supervision.  Duties may include: collecting data, tracking, monitoring and counting animals, computer entry, developing educational materials, conducting creel surveys, fish sampling, habitat measurement, fish stocking, hiking, camping, swimming or working varied hours.  Fieldwork may involve long days outdoors in extreme temperatures.

Student interns are hired on a temporary basis and paid an hourly rate of $11.00 (returning interns at $12.00). Interns are not benefit eligible and work at the discretion of the appointing authority. Interns may be employed until they no longer meet the program requirements or the department determines that the work is no longer required. Assignments are typically full-time (unless indicated by hiring supervisor) and generally last between 8 to 12 weeks.

Eligibility requirements

* Currently enrolled in curriculum leading towards a Bachelor’s or higher level degree on a full time basis (usually 12 semester hours) and pursuing a major in Wildlife Biology or closely related field applicable to the internship opportunity (subject to verification)

* Proof of eligibility to work in the United States

* Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or above

* Ability to pass a post-offer physical exam (if applicable)

* Valid driver’s license (free of restrictions, if applicable)

Application & Selection Process

*        Eligible students interested in summer employment must apply through www.azstatejobs.gov<http://www.azstatejobs.gov> .  Click “Search for Jobs” and select “Game and Fish Department” from the agency dropdown.

*        Students must submit a cover letter and resume in one document when applying.

*        Students must outline in their cover letter, by priority and by hiring supervisor name, the internships they choose to apply for.  Students may select up to five internships to apply for.

*        Students must attach unofficial transcripts of college coursework.

*         Resumes must be submitted to the site no later than close date.

The anticipated start date for the internships is May 22, 2017.

For additional information on the internship program, contact Milani Barron, Staffing Manager at (623) 236-7319 mbarron@azgfd.gov<mailto:mbarron@azgfd.gov> , or Brisa Daniel, Staffing Analyst at (623) 236-7323 bdaniel@azgfd.gov<mailto:bdaniel@azgfd.gov>.

Position Available: Interpretation, Education and Public Outreach Intern

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=3DECOLOG&req=3D2017-ACI-013

Working collaboratively with the Grand Canyon =E2=80=93 Parashant National

Monument, the Great Basin Institute is recruiting one intern to assist with

environmental stewardship and historical preservation by spending time

working on projects such as invasives inventory, air quality monitoring and

the production of a variety of public education materials. These projects

will assist in the creation, promotion, facilitation and improvement of the

public=E2=80=99s understanding of natural, historic and cultural resources

significance, as well as recreational opportunities within the Monument.

The intern will be spending the majority of time on writing and researching

scientific and historic information to be used in the Parashant National

Monument Mobile Application. Other duties will include public events and

outreach, data entry, compiling information to be used in social media and

assisting with other natural and cultural resource projects.

Compensation:

o Living Allowance: $9,520.00

o AmeriCorps Education Award*: $2,199.92

o Student Loan Forbearance**

o Paid Interest Accrual**

o Housing not provided

* AmeriCorps Education Award may be used for past, present or future

educational expenses.

** On qualifying federal student loans

Timeline:  Starts February 2017 or upon availability for five months

Location: St. George, UT. The Grand Canyon =E2=80=93 Parashant National Monument is

located in the northwest corner of Arizona, bordering Nevada to the west

and near the southern border of Utah.

Qualifications:

o Bachelor=E2=80=99s Degree in Life Sciences preferred, such as: Natural Resources

Management, Environmental Resources, Environmental Education, or related

subject;

o Experience developing and implementing environmental education and

outreach programs;

o Motivated, self-starter who is detail oriented;

o Flexibility to handle competing and changing priorities;

o Ability to communicate effectively with a diverse public in a variety of

forums;

o Ability to speak English and Spanish conversationally, desirable but not

required;

o Ability to work in harsh and rapidly changing environments;

o Possess clean, valid, state-issued driver=E2=80=99s license; and

o Meet AmeriCorps eligibility requirements: (1) U.S. citizenship or legal

resident alien status, (2) eligible to receive an AmeriCorps Education

Award (limit of four in a lifetime or the equivalent of two full-time

education awards), (3) pass National Sex Offender Public Website (NSOPW)

and federal criminal background checks, (4) Adhere to the rules,

regulations and code of conduct as specified in the Member Service

Agreement; and (5) Will not engage in any prohibited activities as listed

in the Member Service Agreement.

How to Apply:

Please visit our employment web page to apply directly through our online

portal:

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=3DECOLOG&req=3D2017-ACI-013

We conform to all the laws, statutes, and regulations concerning equal

employment opportunities and affirmative action. We strongly encourage

women, minorities, individuals with disabilities and veterans to apply to

all of our job openings. We are an equal opportunity employer and all

qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without

regard to race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender

identity, or national origin, age, disability status, Genetic Information &

Testing, Family & Medical Leave, protected veteran status, or any other

characteristic protected by law. We prohibit Retaliation against

individuals who bring forth any complaint, orally or in writing, to the

employer or the government, or against any individuals who assist or

participate in the investigation of any complaint or otherwise oppose

discrimination.

Minnesota.SummerResInternships

Summer Research Internships 2017

Are you interested in gaining field research experience and learning about the
ecology and evolution of plants and plant-animal interactions in fragmented
prairie? The Echinacea Project is offering several summer research
internships for students and soon-to-be graduates. We have diverse
potential projects for students with backgrounds or interests in plant
ecology, pollination biology, evolution, statistics, conservation, and
computer science. In the past, interns have completed projects on a variety
of topics including pollination biology, prairie restoration, and
plant-herbivore interactions. Housing in western Minnesota is provided and
there is a stipend. Undergraduate students have the opportunity to do an
independent project as an REU participant.

QUALIFICATIONS
No experience is necessary, but you must be enthusiastic and hard-working. You
will survey natural plant populations, measure plant traits in experimental
plots, hand-pollinate plants, observe & collect insects, and assist in all
aspects of research. Applicants must be available to begin in Minnesota in
early June. The exact end date of the position in late August or early
September is flexible. We welcome and encourage scientists of all
backgrounds, particularly those underrepresented in science, to apply to
work with us!

MORE INFORMATION
Information about our offerings for summer 2017 and the 2017-2018 year are
here: http://echinaceaproject.org/opportunities/.

APPLICATION DEADLINE
Review of applications will begin on February 23rd for REU internships and
on March 2nd for other internship positions.

The team and I are happy to answer any further questions.

Stuart Wagenius, Ph.D.
Conservation Scientist
Division of Plant Science and Conservation
Chicago Botanic Garden
1000 Lake Cook Road
Glencoe, IL 60022
phone: 847 835 6978
fax: 847 835 6975
email: echinaceaproject@gmail.com

Echinacea angustifolia <echinaceaproject@gmail.com>

Jobs: Dartmouth.Summer.Undergraduate.REU

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Research Experience for Undergraduates in Computational Biology –
Dartmouth College – Summer 2017
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The Zhaxybayeva lab in the Biology department at Dartmouth College
(http://www.dartmouth.edu/~ecglab/) is pleased to announce an NSF
Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position to study the
evolutionary history of enigmatic, virus-like entities called Gene
Transfer Agents (GTAs). As their name implies, GTAs are hypothesized to
be used by bacteria as gene delivery systems. The Zhaxybayeva lab uses
comparative genomics, phylogenetics, and mathematical modeling to learn
more about this fascinating biological system. This internship is ideal
for candidates with background in mathematics, statistics, computer
science, or engineering interested in exploring how computational
approaches are used in solving biological problems. The student is not
expected to have prior experience working with biological systems. The
student will work closely with Dr. Olga Zhaxybayeva and Dr. Shannon
Soucy and will learn the basics of genomic analyses, how to utilize high
performance computing facilities, read primary scientific literature,
and present scientific research. The candidate must be a citizen or
permanent resident of the United States of America or its possessions,
and enrolled as an undergraduate student in the Fall 2017. Individuals
of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. The 9-week
internship is tentatively expected to begin on June 21, 2017 and end on
August 18, 2017. The candidate will receive $4,500 stipend, and will be
reimbursed for the costs of lodging and travel to Dartmouth College.

To apply, please e-mail the following application materials in a single
PDF file to Shannon Soucy (Shannon.Soucy@dartmouth.edu) with the subject
line “REU” no later than March 10, 2017:
1.    A statement with the following information:
a.    Why you are interested in this position.
b.    Your future plans after graduation from college.
c.    Confirmation of your eligibility for the REU program.
d.    Dates you are available to start and end this position.
e.    The name and contact information of one person who will serve as
your reference. Please arrange the letter of recommendation to be sent
to Shannon.Soucy@dartmouth.edu directly by your reference.
f.    Your email address and phone number.
2.    Curriculum Vitae (or resume).
3.    Transcript (unofficial is acceptable).

Dartmouth College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer
with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We prohibit
discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national
origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability,
veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status.

Job: AmherstCollege.ResAssist.EvolutionDiseaseGenomics

RESEARCH ASSISTANT POSITION
EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE

The Hood Lab (https://www.amherst.edu/people/facstaff/mhood) in the
Biology Department at Amherst College is seeking to fill a full-time
research assistant position.  The position is for one year, and there
is the possibility to reappointment for a second year.  Ongoing
projects address the evolutionary ecology of infectious disease in
natural plant populations and evolutionary genomics of the pathogen’s
mating compatibility genes.  Activities in this lab span a wide range
of approaches, including molecular genetics, population biology, and
greenhouse/field work.  The research assistant will gain experience and
participate in each of these activities as well as in general lab
maintenance and operation.  Start date will be as early as April, 2017.

Qualifications:  Bachelor’s degree in biology or related field,
previous laboratory experience, and motivation to engage in biology
research are expected.

To apply online, please visit our web site at https://jobs.amherst.edu
and https://apply.interfolio.com/40429

Amherst College is an equal opportunity employer and encourages women,
persons of color, and persons with disabilities to apply. The College
is committed to enriching its educational experience and its culture
through the diversity of its faculty, administration, and staff.

Samford Research Experience for Undergraduates in Biology and Chemistry

http://www.samford.edu/programs/undergraduate/research-experience/

With funding from the National Science Foundation, the 2016 Samford

University REU program will offer hands-on, field- and laboratory-based

research experiences to US undergraduates.  In this 9-week residential

experience, students will work one-on-one with experienced researchers in

biology and chemistry to design, conduct, and present research related to

the chemistry, genetics, and ecology of organisms, populations, and

communities of Oak Mountain State Park, a large and diverse suburban park

located in the southern Appalachians.  Potential research topics include

plant and animal ecology, microbiology, fire ecology, water quality,

biochemistry, plant and fungal natural products chemistry and bioactivity,

plant taxonomy, and aquatic community ecology.

Quick Facts

Application Deadline: February 14, 2017

Program Timeline: May 29=96July 29, 2017

=95 $525 per week stipend

=95 Travel, room, board and research expenses covered

=95 12 students will be accepted into the program

Reasons to Apply

=95 Explore the worlds of field and laboratory research

=95 Explore your career opportunities as a working scientist

=95 Work closely with expert scientists to develop your own project

=95=09Develop your understanding of scientific ethics and social justice

=95 Spend the summer at Oak Mountain State Park, Alabama=92s largest state park

Application Process

All application materials should be submitted electronically to reu@samford.edu.

Deadline: February 24, 2017

Students must be US citizens or Permanent Residents and have completed two

years of undergraduate study by May, 2017, including one year of

college-level biology.  Students must be enrolled in an undergraduate

program at accredited institutions in the United States at the time the REU

program is held.  Please submit:

=95 Application Form

=95 Transcripts

=95 Letters of Recommendation

=95 Personal Statement

For more information, go to

http://www.samford.edu/programs/undergraduate/research-experience/ or email

reu@samford.edu.

Seasonal Job Announcement: High Mountain Lakes Field Assistant

Term: Seasonal position from approximately June 1 to October 31, 2017.

(Start date is dependent on spring snow pack and trail access. End date is

subject to change due to cold weather and snow.)

Schedule: The schedule is typically a 40-hour work period but is dependent upon

weather, work load, etc. A 40-hour period is generally Mon =96 Thursday, 10

hours per day with 3 days off, but may include Mon-Friday, 8 hours per day.

Hourly pay rate: $12.11 =96 $14.36

Work Duties: The successful applicant will serve as a member of a 2-person field crew for

extended trips in backcountry and front country terrain. Primarily, the team

will work at restoration sites focused on the removal of non-native trout to

benefit Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog populations (Rana sierrae). Gill

nets, and occasionally backpack electrofishers, will be used for fish

removal. The restoration sites are in three northern California wilderness

areas, range in elevation from 6,000 to 9,000=92, and will require a

combination of backpacking and 4WD to access. The team will also conduct

surveys of nearby Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog populations. In addition

to these duties, approximately 10% of the job will consist of monitoring and

resource assessment of backcountry fisheries throughout the northern Sierra

Nevada, therefore the ability to implement multiple survey protocols to

collect fish, amphibian, and habitat data for lakes, streams, and meadows in

the Sierra Nevada is necessary for success.

Physical Demands: Field work often involves extended travel with a backpack over rugged, high

elevation terrain, both on trail and off trail. There is potential for

exposure to all types of weather, slippery rocks, insects, poison oak, rough

or fast-moving water, and cold water temperatures. Long periods of hiking,

carrying equipment, swimming, and/or standing may be required. All survey,

backpacking, and camping equipment is provided

Minimum Qualifications: The successful applicant must possess the following minimum qualifications:

– Must possess a valid California driver=92s license, Class C.

– Education equivalent to completion of two years of college with a minimum

of 10 semester hours in science (transcript required) OR one year of

equivalent work experience surveying, studying, or evaluation fish or

wildlife populations, data, habitats, or other related work experience.

– Ability to lift and carry heavy loads over rugged cross-country terrain

for extended periods of time in a high elevation wilderness setting.

– Ability to live and work safely in a remote wilderness setting.

Desired Qualifications: Ideally, the successful applicant will possess the following skills:

– Experience with fish survey techniques, including gill-netting,

electrofishing, snorkeling, or similar techniques.

– Experience and aptitude operating handheld electronic equipment, such as

digital cameras, GPS units, radios, PDAs, etc.

– Experience backpacking, traveling, or working in high elevation

backcountry wilderness settings is highly desirable.

– Sufficient experience with computer applications to input and manage data,

including MS Word, MS Excel, and MS Access.

– Ability to be well organized and handle occasionally challenging field

logistics.

– Ability to thoroughly collect data.

– Ability to effectively communicate with field crew members and the public.

Contact information:

Please e-mail a resume, including 3 professional references (and copy of

your transcripts, if applicable) to Isaac.Chellman@wildlife.ca.gov. Cover

letters are not required.

Seasonal Job Announcement: High Mountain Lakes Field Assistant

Term: Seasonal position from approximately June 1 to October 31, 2017.

(Start date is dependent on spring snow pack and trail access. End date is

subject to change due to cold weather and snow.)

Schedule: The schedule is typically a 40-hour work period but is dependent upon

weather, work load, etc. A 40-hour period is generally Mon =96 Thursday, 10

hours per day with 3 days off, but may include Mon-Friday, 8 hours per day.

Hourly pay rate: $12.11 =96 $14.36

Work Duties: The successful applicant will serve as a member of a 2-person field crew for

extended trips in backcountry and front country terrain. Primarily, the team

will work at restoration sites focused on the removal of non-native trout to

benefit Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog populations (Rana sierrae). Gill

nets, and occasionally backpack electrofishers, will be used for fish

removal. The restoration sites are in three northern California wilderness

areas, range in elevation from 6,000 to 9,000=92, and will require a

combination of backpacking and 4WD to access. The team will also conduct

surveys of nearby Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog populations. In addition

to these duties, approximately 10% of the job will consist of monitoring and

resource assessment of backcountry fisheries throughout the northern Sierra

Nevada, therefore the ability to implement multiple survey protocols to

collect fish, amphibian, and habitat data for lakes, streams, and meadows in

the Sierra Nevada is necessary for success.

Physical Demands: Field work often involves extended travel with a backpack over rugged, high

elevation terrain, both on trail and off trail. There is potential for

exposure to all types of weather, slippery rocks, insects, poison oak, rough

or fast-moving water, and cold water temperatures. Long periods of hiking,

carrying equipment, swimming, and/or standing may be required. All survey,

backpacking, and camping equipment is provided

Minimum Qualifications: The successful applicant must possess the following minimum qualifications:

– Must possess a valid California driver=92s license, Class C.

– Education equivalent to completion of two years of college with a minimum

of 10 semester hours in science (transcript required) OR one year of

equivalent work experience surveying, studying, or evaluation fish or

wildlife populations, data, habitats, or other related work experience.

– Ability to lift and carry heavy loads over rugged cross-country terrain

for extended periods of time in a high elevation wilderness setting.

– Ability to live and work safely in a remote wilderness setting.

Desired Qualifications: Ideally, the successful applicant will possess the following skills:

– Experience with fish survey techniques, including gill-netting,

electrofishing, snorkeling, or similar techniques.

– Experience and aptitude operating handheld electronic equipment, such as

digital cameras, GPS units, radios, PDAs, etc.

– Experience backpacking, traveling, or working in high elevation

backcountry wilderness settings is highly desirable.

– Sufficient experience with computer applications to input and manage data,

including MS Word, MS Excel, and MS Access.

– Ability to be well organized and handle occasionally challenging field

logistics.

– Ability to thoroughly collect data.

– Ability to effectively communicate with field crew members and the public.

Contact information:

Please e-mail a resume, including 3 professional references (and copy of

your transcripts, if applicable) to Isaac.Chellman@wildlife.ca.gov. Cover

letters are not required.

MS Reseearch Assistantships at Michigan Technological University

We seek two MS students with interests in aquatic ecology, limnology and ecotoxicology to pursue research projects at Michigan Technological University. Research topics include 1) The importance of overwintering on yellow perch proximate composition, persistent organic pollutant bioaccumulation and stable isotope (d13C & d15N) ecology and 2) Mapping water quality metrics in a north temperate dimictic lake over an annual growing season. Each of these projects represent a combination of laboratory and field work with sampling efforts focused in Michigan=92s Upper Peninsula region.

Preferred candidates will have strong backgrounds in aquatic ecology and limnology in addition to good lab techniques associated with working in a chemistry lab environment. Additional experience and background in ecotoxicology, field work, and familiarity with operating small watercraft are beneficial, however, these skills are not essential to apply. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact Dr. Gord Paterson (gpaterso@mtu.edu) for specific project details and application instructions. Both of these positions are supported by graduate teaching assistantships in the Biological Sciences Department at Michigan Technological University. We anticipate potential candidates to officially apply to enroll for the fall semester, starting August 2017. Applications will be reviewed as they are received and review will continue until suitable individuals are selected.

REU Opportunity Summer 2017: “Long-Term Resilience of the Chihuahua Desert Ecosystem”

Curious about how human related disturbance impacts vegetation and soil in a fragile desert ecosystem? The Jornada Basin LTER in collaboration with New Mexico State University invites applications for a NSF sponsored Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) in summer 2017. This 10-week experience enables you to investigate long-term impacts of different disturbance types on the resistance and resilience of desert vegetation, biological soil crusts and soil properties. As an REU you will complete final (20th year) measurements on a unique study designed to determine how resilience is affected by disturbance type, frequency, intensity, and soil/geomorphic surface/plant and biological soil crust community. The study is replicated at 5 locations in southern New Mexico on and near the Jornada Basin LTER. You will work as part of a team collecting data on plant and biological soil crust community composition, soil aggregate stability and carbon flux rates. Additional measurements of soil hydrology may be included depending on time and interest. You may have the opportunity to serve as a co-author on one or more publications resulting from this 20-year dataset.

This REU experience provides you with:

=95 High quality research experience in desert ecology

=95 Skills in field biology and laboratory methodologies

=95 Opportunity to work alongside researchers from interdisciplinary fields at a NSF funded LTER facility

=95 Participation in the 1-day Desert Ecology short course taught by Jornada LTER scientists

=95 Opportunity to disseminate results in presentations and scientific publications

=95 A stipend of $8000 for 10 weeks

Requirements:

=95 You must be enrolled as an undergraduate at an approved university for spring and fall of 2017.

=95 Valid US driver=92s license is required.

=95 Ability to work full days outside in the sun, wind, and low humidity.

=95 Interest and ability to stay overnight in field station lodging. Accommodations will be provided on-site with other researchers at the remote Jornada field station located 40 miles north of Las Cruces, NM.

=95 Your travel to and from Las Cruces from your home will need to be paid from your stipend

Your application should include:

=95 Letter of intent including statement of interest and previous research experience

=95 Resume or Curriculum Vitae

=95 Unofficial undergraduate transcripts

For more information on the Jornada Basin LTER please visit https://jornada.nmsu.edu/lter. You can find information on the research mentors here:

Nicole Pietrasiak http://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/pes/nicole-pietrasiak.html; and

Jeff Herrick https://jornada.nmsu.edu/lter/user/10156/view.

Applications due: March 1, 2017. Please send your applications to Nicole Pietrasiak (npietras@nmsu.edu<mailto:npietras@nmsu.edu>) and Jeff Herrick (jeff.herrick@ars.usda.gov)<mailto:jeff.herrick@ars.usda.gov)>

Positions Available for Botany and Wildlife Field Crews outside Las Vegas

For complete position descriptions and to apply, please follow the links

below.

*Botany Field Team Lead*

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=3DECOLOG&req=3D2017-ACI-009

In cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service Humboldt-Toiyabe National

Forest, the Great Basin Institute is recruiting a Botany Field Team Lead to

join our AmeriCorps program. Working cooperatively with a GBI/USFS Research

Coordinator as part of a larger crew (consisting of 3 Botany Field

Technicians, and occasionally 1 Wildlife crew lead and 2 technicians). The

Field Lead will help to coordinate and implement a variety of

project-specific biological surveys and habitat restoration projects. The

Field Lead will be responsible for the working directly with the Research

Coordinator conducting project activities, including ensuring adherence to

agreed-upon protocols and procedures, serving as a positive role model for

other field team members, and facilitating accurate completion and

documentation of project efforts.

*Botany Field Technician*

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=3DECOLOG&req=3D2017-ACI-010

In cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service Humboldt-Toiyabe National

Forest, the Great Basin Institute is recruiting three (3) Botany Field

Technicians to join our AmeriCorps program. The Technicians will work

cooperatively as part of a team to support a variety of botany,

restoration, and avian biology projects. Project work will occur primarily

on the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area (SMNRA). The Technicians

will work on a number of projects, including surveys for plant and animal

species of interest to determine presence and minimize impacts to these

species. Primary foci for surveys will include rare plants and butterfly

habitat. Restoration and enhancement activities may include: identification

and documentation of disturbed locations in sensitive habitats; collecting

seed of local genotypes of native plant species; closure of unauthorized

motorized routes and recreation concentrated use areas; monitoring of past

restoration projects and recommendations for sites not progressing as

anticipated; burned area rehabilitation; and riparian and spring

restoration.

*Lead Biological Field Technician (Wildlife) *

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=3DECOLOG&req=3D2017-ACI-011

In cooperation with Forest Service=E2=80=99s Spring Mountains National Recreation

Area (SMNRA), the Great Basin Institute is recruiting a Lead Wildlife

Technician to join our AmeriCorps program and lead two technicians in

multiple wildlife field surveys. The Field Lead will help to coordinate and

implement a variety of project-specific wildlife surveys and assist with

restoration projects. The Lead technician will direct crews while

conducting acoustic callback surveys and nest searches for two sensitive

raptor species, Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) and Flammulated Owl

(Psiloscops flammeolus), that are both known to occur in the region. Early

morning point count and nest surveys for migratory bird species will also

be conducted for two projects. Passive bat detection will be conducting by

setting and moving equipment throughout the project area. Wildlife

technicians will work with botanical technicians on habitat surveys for

sensitive butterfly species by identifying larval host and nectar plants.

Native seed collection for ongoing restoration projects will also be

conducted during the field season. On-the-job training in plant

identification will be provided. Opportunities to participate in training

(e.g. GIS, Wilderness 1st Aid) during the season may be available. Lead

Technicians will also be responsible for facilitating accurate completion

and documentation of project efforts.

The Field Technician must be able to work in difficult terrain that may

include steep, rocky slopes, areas of dense trees, and lower elevation

desert. Exposure to a variety of adverse weather conditions are likely with

average day time temperatures above 100 degrees, night time temperature as

low as 30, extreme sun exposure, and monsoonal rain events should all be

expected. This work is physically demanding and requires long hours of

off-trail hiking while conducting surveys. Survey protocols and times will

vary throughout the field season and crews must be able to adapt quickly to

working a variety of hours (night surveys for the Flammulated owl, dawn

surveys for nesting and breeding birds, daytime surveys for butterfly

larval host and nectar plants), while learning a variety of survey

protocols. Overnight camping will be required in some cases. Travel to

survey sites may require driving on narrow, winding, dirt roads for

distances up to 20 miles. While driving to and from survey sites, frequent

encounters with vehicles, hikers, mountain bikers, and horseback riders

should be expected on backcountry roads. Radio communication will be

necessary for emergencies and for communication with the Project Manager.

*Biological Field Technician (Wildlife) *

http://crcareers.thegreatbasininstitute.org/careers/careers.aspx?rf=3DECOLOG&req=3D2017-ACI-012

In cooperation with Forest Service=E2=80=99s Spring Mountains National Recreation

Area (SMNRA), the Great Basin Institute is recruiting a 2 Wildlife

Technicians to join our AmeriCorps program conduct multiple wildlife field

surveys. The Field Technician will assist the crew lead on a variety of

project-specific wildlife surveys and restoration projects. Crews will

conduct acoustic callback surveys and nest searches for two sensitive

raptor species, Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) and Flammulated Owl

(Psiloscops flammeolus), that are both known to occur in the region. Early

morning point count and nest surveys for migratory bird species will also

be conducted for two projects. Passive bat detection will be conducting by

setting and moving equipment throughout the project areas. Additionally

technicians will work with botanical technicians on habitat surveys for

sensitive butterfly species by identifying larval host and nectar plants.

Native seed collection for ongoing restoration projects will also be

conducted during the field season. On-the-job training in plant

identification will be provided. Opportunities to participate in training

(e.g. GIS, Wilderness 1st Aid) during the season may be available.

The Field Technician must be able to work in difficult terrain that may

include steep, rocky slopes, areas of dense trees, and lower elevation

desert. Exposure to a variety of adverse weather conditions are likely with

average day time temperatures above 100 degrees, night time temperature as

low as 30, extreme sun exposure, and monsoonal rain events should all be

expected. This work is physically demanding and requires long hours of

off-trail hiking while conducting surveys. Survey protocols and times will

vary throughout the field season and crews must be able to adapt quickly to

working a variety of hours (night surveys for the Flammulated owl, dawn

surveys for nesting and breeding birds, daytime surveys for butterfly

larval host and nectar plants), while learning a variety of survey

protocols. Overnight camping will be required in some cases. Travel to

survey sites may require driving on narrow, winding, dirt roads for

distances up to 20 miles. While driving to and from survey sites, frequent

encounters with vehicles, hikers, mountain bikers, and horseback riders

should be expected on backcountry roads. Radio communication will be

necessary for emergencies and for communication with the Project Manager.

JOB OPPORTUNITY: Field Botanist Tucson, AZ

WestLand Resources Inc., is actively seeking on-call Field Botanists /

Technicians to support upcoming projects (expected to start in May) for our

environmental consulting practice. WestLand specializes in the technical and

procedural requirements necessary for compliance with the National

Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act, and the Endangered

Species Act. Our biological resources practice includes: development of

natural resources management plans; conducting ecological investigations and

base-line studies; and mitigation planning, design and implementation. This

position will be based in Tucson, with potential for travel outside of

Tucson up to 5 days per week.

Responsibilities:

The Field Botanist /Technician position will be responsible for surveying

for native fauna and flora, and reporting findings.

REQUIREMENTS

=95Associate’s degree in a biologically related field required. Bachelor’s

degree preferred

=95Prior experience with identification of Southwest plants required

=95Ability to work as a member of a cohesive team

=95Ability to work in a fast-paced and creative environment

=95Ability to work in extreme desert temperatures and rough terrain

=95Experience with Microsoft office products

=95Knowledge of Southwest fauna preferred

WestLand prides itself on providing a work environment that is relaxed and

collaborative, while supporting the highest standards for project delivery

and work product quality.  Our team approach to both project and staff

development naturally fosters a tight-knit environment of uniquely skilled

and experienced professionals, learning from and helping one another.

Westland is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be

an Equal Opportunity Employer. We invite applications from all interested

parties including women, minorities, veterans and persons with disabilities.

We maintain a drug-free workplace and perform pre-employment substance

abuse testing

EOE AA M/F/Vet/Disability

Research Assistantship in Urban Forest Ecology

Support is available in the Johnson lab for a Doctoral (preferred) or

Master of Science student in urban forest ecology. The successful applicant

will join a project that supports urban forest management decision-making

by testing both ecological theory and science-based management approaches

in urban environments, synthesis of multiple long-term data sets describing

biophysical and social variables, and increasing information connectivity

networks. The successful applicant will assist in these efforts and develop

a thesis that contributes to the project. Demonstrated skills in plant

identification and/or analysis of large data sets are preferred, as is a

Master=E2=80=99s degree for those seeking to earn a doctorate.

The University of Maryland faculty includes experts in a broad range of

related fields, including urban forestry, landscape architecture, ecology,

soil science, environmental science and policy, and many specialties in

biology. The University is affiliated with the National Center for

Socio-Environmental Synthesis (http://www.sesync.org). Additional

information about UMD and the Plant Science Graduate Program of the

Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture can be found at

http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/

<http://www.gradschool.umd.edu/welcome/welcome.html> and

http://psla.umd.edu/.

Send a CV, unofficial transcripts, and a personal statement detailing

research interests, motivation, and relevant experience via email. Review

of applications will begin immediately.  A summer 2017 start may be

possible for a highly qualified applicant.

Contact:

Lea R. Johnson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

University of Maryland

2134 Plant Sciences Building

College Park, MD 20742

(301) 405-1602 Office

leaj@umd.edu

https://psla.umd.edu/people/dr-lea-johnson

Summer Field Technician Jobs in Plant & Insect Ecology

We are seeking six, highly motivated individuals who are interested working as part of a large team of investigators examining diversity patterns in restored grasslands that are part of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP).  In Kansas, the CRP program includes over 2 million acres=97much of which is re-established, native grassland. However, a dominant grazer is lacking on most of these sites despite the critical role that bison historically played in this grassland ecosystem. Our study will test how two CRP plantings (CP2 and CP25), which differ in the number of forbs planted, and the effects of periodic grazing influence the restoration of plant and insect abundance on 108 grassland sites across the precipitation gradient in Kansas.

The technicians will work as part of one, unified team that is subdivided into three field crews located in east, central, or western Kansas. Each field crew will work from mid-May to early-August.  The majority of the field effort will be spent in remote short- to tallgrass prairie habitats.  Primary tasks will include plant, insect, and soil sampling in the field, data entry, and sample preparation.  Applicants need to be able work under all weather conditions and be good team players.  Some experience with plant or insect sampling and/or identification is preferred, but dedicated, hardworking individuals will also be considered.  Starting pay is $10/hr plus free housing during the summer of field work.=20

If interested, please contact Dr. Greg Houseman (Greg.Houseman@wichita.edu) or Dr. Mary Liz Jameson (MaryLiz.Jameson@gmail.com).

Clemson-USDA National Needs PhD Fellowship

Clemson University is proud to invite applications for PhD fellowships in “Computationally Intensive Genomics Analysis and Application in Agriculture”

For more information, please visit the following website:

[http://www.clemsonnationalneedsfellows.org%3chttp:/www.clemsonnationalneedsfellows]www.clemsonnationalneedsfellows.org<http://www.clemsonnationalneedsfellows.org>

Greenhouse Research Technician, WI

Prescribed fire effects on seedbanks of pine barrens

Department of Forestry, Michigan State University

and USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

Position description: The Department of Forestry at Michigan State University, in collaboration with USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station, is seeking a highly motivated seasonal research technician for Summer 2017 to assist with a project investigating soil heating processes and the effects of soil heating on soil carbon, nutrients, seedbanks and hardwood regeneration in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. The technician will be primarily responsible for maintaining the field-collected soil samples in a seed bank germination greenhouse study near Rhinelander, WI, U.S.A. The technician will have opportunity to also participate in field activities. The technician will be co-supervised by a Project Manager and Research Scientist.  The technician will be trained on the job and responsible for following safety and study protocols. In addition, opportunity exists for technician to pursue mentored independent research related to the overall project goals. The abstract for the project is available here: http://www.firescience.gov/JFSP_advanced_search_results_detail.cfm?jdbid=3D%24%26J3%3CW%40%2 0%20%0A

Qualifications: The successful applicants will have the following knowledge, skills and abilities: 1) previous greenhouse experience as a technician; 2) strong organization and communication skills; 3) demonstrated ability to work well independently and in a team environment; 4) demonstrated commitment to completing work with a high level of initiative, skill and professionalism; 5) a high aptitude for adverse environmental conditions; and 6) possession of a valid US driver’s license. We desire the technician to have experience in plant identification in the upper Lake States region, specifically northern dry forests and pine barrens.

Working conditions: This position will be largely greenhouse-based. In the greenhouse, the technician is responsible for providing own gear, including supportive, closed-toe shoes, to accommodate long periods of standing and the warm, humid conditions of a greenhouse.  For occasional field work, the conditions may include exposure to inclement weather, full sun, biting insects, and poison ivy and walking over uneven terrain; lifting and carrying field packs weighing up to 40 lb.; bending, squatting, kneeling, sitting or standing for prolonged periods of time; operating measurement or sampling equipment with a strong level of fine motor skills; and performing repetitive tasks with a high level of precision and accuracy. Personal protective equipment necessary for performing the position will be provided. The technician will be responsible for providing their own personal field gear (appropriate field clothing, footwear, daypack, etc.).

Salary: Hourly wage commensurate with experience, for 40 hours/week starting approximately June 5, 2017 and continuing for approximately 4.5 months. We may be able to accommodate earlier or later start & end dates with advance notification (please specify any start/end date requests in your cover letter).

Location: The position is located near Rhinelander, WI. Occasional overnight travel may be required to perform field measurements in Ashland, WI.

Housing: Housing is not provided.  Reasonable dormitory accommodations are available at a University of Wisconsin field station 20 minutes north of the office location.

To Apply: Applicants should email as a single PDF: 1) a letter of interest detailing your qualifications for the position and the dates of your availability, 2) resume/CV with list of relevant coursework, and 3) a list of three professional references with contact information (institution, email address, phone number), to Dr. Christel Kern at cckern@fs.fed.us<mailto:cckern@fs.fed.us> . Please name your file as: LastnameFirstname_Application_YYYYMMDD.

Application deadline: Applications will be considered on a rolling basis beginning February 15, 2017 so you are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

For more information: Contact Dr. Christel Kern at cckern@fs.fed.us or Dr. Jessica Miesel at mieselje@msu.edu.

Undergraduate Research Assistant: Forest Restoration and Fire Management

An undergraduate research assistant position is available in the Quantitative Forest Management laboratory in the Division of Forestry and Natural Resources at West Virginia University.

The undergraduate research assistant will assist a master=92s student with completing field work for a forest restoration project. The field work will be conducted in the mixed conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada in Northern California, with majority of time spent in the Eldorado National Forest. The main objective of the project is to evaluate post fire restoration efforts made after the 2004 Power Fire. This project will help identify successful restoration techniques to reestablish open, old growth conditions in the Sierra Nevada.

Field Work responsibilities will include collecting forest inventory data, soil samples, vegetation surveys, basic ecophysiological data, and micro-environmental variables. A variety of equipment will be used including, basic field work items (clinometer, d-tape, etc.) and potentially more advanced machines (ceptometer, gas exchange analyzer, etc.). Experience with more advanced equipment is appreciated, but not necessary.

This position will be for about a 3-month period during the summer from May 2017 to August 2017. Work will average 40 hrs/week. The salary offered will depend on prior experience. Travel to California, along with housing and a small food stipend will be provided.

Qualifications: All junior or senior students currently enrolled in an academic program related to forestry, biology, ecology, environmental sciences, or similarly related natural resource fields are encouraged to apply. Applicants should be highly self-motivated and possess a strong work ethic. A background or strong interest in conducting field-based research is desirable. A cumulative GPA greater than 3.0 in undergraduate coursework is preferable. Candidates must be willing and able to travel long distances, camp outdoors on occasion, do physically demanding work, and work in hot or otherwise uncomfortable conditions. Applicants must possess a valid driver=92s license.

Please submit a cover letter, resume, and contact information of two references. Applications will be considered immediately and continue until the position is filled. To ensure full consideration please submit material by February 24, 2017. For additional information or to submit application material, please contact Iris Allen (ica0002@mix.wvu.edu).

Conservation Genetic Lab Technician

The deadline is February 10th.

Title: Conservation Genetics Lab Technician

Agency: Texas A&M University, Institute of Renewable Natural Resources

Location: Dallas, TX

Job Description: Mussel Research Group at Texas A&M University Institute of Renewable Natural Resources is looking to hire a highly motivated Lab Technician. The individual will assist research in conservation genetics of freshwater mussels in Texas. Primary job duties include archiving tissue samples, DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, and fragment analyses; however, the individual should expect occasional field sampling of mussels. Fieldwork includes visual and tactile search for mussels (wading and snorkeling), mussel identification, and data entry. Typical work schedule: 5 days per week, 8 hrs per day. Occasionally, longer workdays may be required to complete field sampling.

Applicants must be self-motivated, enthusiastic, and enjoy working with others. Applicants should anticipate residing in Dallas, Texas.

Salary: $900 every 2 weeks

Qualifications: Bachelor=92s degree in Biology or related field; experience extracting DNA and PCR; excellent communication skills and competency to work independently. Preference will be given to applicants with strong background in phylogenetics/population genetics, work experience in a molecular genetics laboratory, and/or familiarity with population genetics and phylogenetic analysis software.

Tentative Start Date: February 28, 2017. This position is initially for 4 months; however, it may be extended depending on performance and there is the possibility to switch to a graduate degree at Texas A&M University.

As a single email attachment, submit cover letter, resume, and contact information for 3 references to Kentaro Inoue (kentaro.inoue@ag.tamu.edu). Review of applications will start February 10, 2017 and continue until a suitable candidate is found.

Website: http://irnr.tamu.edu/  |  http://tamuirnrmussels.weebly.com/